Locomotive-Shaped Iron Could be a Real Money Train

For WorthPoint member Marilyn Detwiler, this locomotive-shaped iron may be a money train.

Marilyn contacted WorthPoint, requesting information through Ask a Worthologist about an iron she owns that is in the shape of a steam locomotive. This figural iron is a unique household collectible, as only two other similar examples have been documented.

This locomotive-shaped iron, owned by a WorthPoint member who used WorthPoint’s consignment service to place it in auction, may go for more than $10,000 next month. With almost pristine original paint and pin striping, it is apparent that it was hardly used, if ever.

This locomotive-shaped iron, owned by a WorthPoint member who used WorthPoint’s consignment service to place it in auction, may go for more than $10,000 next month. With almost pristine original paint and pin striping, it is apparent that it was hardly used, if ever.

WorthPoint’s brokering program placed the E.B. Cosby Flat Iron in a specialized Iron auction to be held by the Simmons & Company Auctioneers on August 5 and 6, at the Cleveland Marriott Airport Hotel, Cleveland, Ohio. You can attend the auction in person, or watch it online www.proxibid.com/simmons. If you are an iron collector, you can appreciate how this is going to be a very interesting two-day auction, where a large number of unique irons will cross the block. It is possible that bidding on Marilyn’s very rare figural iron could go for more than $10,000.

With the additional weight of the alcohol fuel required to heat it, this locomotive-shaped steam iron would weigh in at a more than 10 pounds, and would have taken a woman with biceps like Popeye’s to use it. With almost pristine original paint and pin striping, it is apparent that it was hardly used, if ever.

Unfortunately, little to nothing is known about the maker of this piece, E.B. Cosby. It is possible that this unique figural iron was a presentation piece, or perhaps it was an example of the maker’s design and production capability.

This is a copy of a drawing of the iron from the original E.B. Crosby patent; many changes appear to have been made to make the iron much more functional. The turned wood handle has a wonderful appearance in the drawing, but would have played havoc and caused many blisters on the user’s hand.

This is a copy of a drawing of the iron from the original E.B. Cosby patent; many changes appear to have been made to make the iron much more functional. The turned wood handle has a wonderful appearance in the drawing, but would have played havoc and caused many blisters on the user’s hand.

Marilyn Detwiler, who found the iron while out shopping with her mother years ago, now has an empty space on the hearth of her fireplace where this amazing iron took center stage for years, being a topic of conservation to all who saw it. That empty spot is just waiting for Marilyn’s next Great Find.

Filed with alcohol fuel, Marilyn’s locomotive-shaped steam iron would weigh in at a more than 10 pounds, and would have taken a woman with biceps like Popeye’s to use it.

Filed with alcohol fuel, Marilyn’s locomotive-shaped steam iron would weigh in at a more than 10 pounds, and would have taken a woman with biceps like Popeye’s to use it.

Some of the irons that will be auctioned off on Aug. 5-6 in Cleveland, Ohio, including  Marilyn’s locomotive iron.

Some of the irons that will be auctioned off on Aug. 5-6 in Cleveland, Ohio, including Marilyn’s locomotive iron.

Interesting Iron-Related Link:

Simmons & Company Auctions
OldandInteresting.com
Irons.com

You can also order an Auction Catalog for this acution directly from Simmons.

The annual Pressing Iron and Trivet Collectors of America (PITCA) convention: will be held Friday and Saturday, August 7-8, 2009, in Cleveland, Ohio, at the Marriott Cleveland Airport Hotel.

Maggie Turnipseed is a WorthPoint General Worthologist, with interests in advertising, Textiles, clothing & accessories, toys, dolls, games & puzzles, glass, jewelry, furniture & furnishings, ethnic, folk & Native American art, metals, fine art, and ceramics.

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No Comments

  1. Susan Landers says:

    After viewing the iron and the Cosby patent photo; I see too many differences to believe this is the real deal. Look at the missing two smoke/steam stacks, missing front grate, missing two windows, difference in wheels. Many odd changes beyond the handle. The locomotive body looks like a cannon barrel. The details do not look correct. Am I the only one that has noticed the extreme difference between patent and item?

  2. MaggieTurnipseed says:

    The iron has 2 patent dates on it, one of 1888 and 1889. We only have a picture of the very first patent, and not the patent that this iron was made from.

    Hope this helps in your understanding of the differences between the drawing and the actual photos of the iron.

  3. anita says:

    it was great .we have a colection of old thing as same as this .we have an alcohol iron made by Englan 1870.
    thanks