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Mystery of ‘Chandler’ Paintings Solved with a Little Detective Work

by Mike Wilcox (03/23/09).

A painting signed simply with the name “Chandler” turns out to have been created by the “W.H. Chandler and Co.” of New York City. Founded by William Henry Chandler, the company produced paintings for sale in department stores in the late 1800 and early 1900s. Seascapes, like this one, were the rarest of all Chandler pieces, and can sell for upwards of $500 today.

A painting signed simply with the name “Chandler” turns out to have been created by the “W. H. Chandler and Co.” of New York City. Founded by William Henry Chandler, the company produced paintings for sale in department stores in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Seascapes, like this one, were the rarest of all Chandler pieces and can sell for upward of $500 today.

Over the years, I have come across a great many pastels but never put two and two together regarding the artists. The reasons are many: One, because most were done by amateurs for whom little biographical information exists; and two, most sell for rather modest amounts. After recently coming across several signed by the same artist, a signature reading “Chandler,” I decided to pull out the stops and do a little research into who this Chandler was.

Generally, when one finds a half-dozen pieces of artwork by the same artist over a period of a couple of years, there is generally some biographical information available, but it was not the case with Chandler. None of the usual reference sources I had on hand, nor any I subscribed, to had anything other than sales of Chandler’s pastels at auction.

In such cases, one has to think outside the loop and broaden the research to first find general references to the artist’s name and narrow it down from there, e.g. Internet searches for “Chandler print,” “Signed Chandler,” “Chandler still life,” etc. I hit pay dirt with “Chandler fruit,” a search based on a Chandler I had just seen of a bowl of fruit, which brought up the artist’s full name—William Henry Chandler—and his date of birth and death (1854-1928). Using this new information, I found an obscure booklet on the artist titled “Chandler—Early American Pastel Artist” by Peter Neeley and a few other references sourced in the booklet that allowed me to put flesh to the bare bones.

As it turned out, “Chandler” was no amateur. In fact, his company had probably produced more pastels than any other artist of his time, and he led a rather interesting life.

William Henry Chandler was born on June 9, 1854, in New York City. His working life started as a cameo engraver in a button factory, but his art output didn’t start in earnest until 1887 when he partnered with his brother, Frank Chandler (1857-1912), to create the label of “W. H. Chandler and Co.” in New York City’s lower Manhattan.

Unlike the work of other decorative-art producers, such as Currier & Ives or Taber Prang, W. H. Chandler and Co. did not turn out art in mass production. Instead, it created its art in what was called “The Loft,” where up to 20 easels were set up with some artists working three at a time. Other artists worked at home on a piecework basis. Pastels were not the only product. W. H. Chandler and Co. produced oils, watercolors and charcoals, as well. The bulk of Chandler’s company’s output was in the form of landscapes, featuring some form of water, such as a lake, stream, river or waterfall, with mountain backdrops dotted with cabins and cottages. Still-life images of fruit bowls and hanging wild game are not as common, and the rarest of all Chandler pieces are seascapes.

Chandler pastels were mainly sold through art stores, art dealers, gift shops and department stores such as Simpson’s, Eaton’s and Hudson Bay in Canada, and Marshall Field’s, Sears, Higbee’s and the May Company in the United States. Chandler operated the company until his death on Feb. 26, 1928. The company was taken over then by William McMurray Thompson, who had apprenticed under Chandler. Today, it is still possible to find a Chandler pastel for less than $200, but Chandler’s day as a relative unknown are over, with some of the larger seascapes pieces now selling for more than $500 at auction and even average landscapes pushing $400.

Mike Wilcox, of Wilcox & Hall Appraisers, is a Worthologist who specializes in Art Nouveau and the Arts and Craft movement.

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75 Responses to “Mystery of ‘Chandler’ Paintings Solved with a Little Detective Work”

  1. Douglass Moody Douglass Moody says:

    Interesting article. Nice bit of sleuthing.

    Please explain this sentence in last paragraph: “Today, it is still possible to find a Chandler pastel for lrdd than $200 . . .”

  2. cynthia says:

    I have a large pastel signed by william M thompson. The painting has been hangling in my parents home for over 50 years The paint is a garden scene with mountaing in the back ground. I would like to know more about this artist he names in hard to find in most data bases.

  3. Mike Wilcox Mike Wilcox says:

    Douglass Moodie wrote:

    “Please explain this sentence in last paragraph: “Today, it is still possible to find a Chandler pastel for lrdd than $200 . . .”

    Hi Douglass, I don’t know quite what you mean by your comment. The statement is pretty clear, what it says is you can still pick up a Chandler Pastel for under $200.00.

    Mike Wilcox

    • I purchased that same picture along with another that must have been sold at the same time but with a different eye sight of the one shown. Both were purchesd at a garage sale for $10.00. I didn’ t have time to research them and gave them away when I got cancer. You just never know what you’ve found unless you do your homework.

  4. Mike Wilcox Mike Wilcox says:

    Hi Cynthia

    William McMurray Thompson apprenticed under Chandler and took over his studio after chandler’s death in 1928. Here’s a book for you:
    http://openlibrary.org/b/OL56149M/R.-Atkinson-Fox-%26-William-M.-Thompson

  5. Richard Wood says:

    I own a Chandler. It hung in my grandmother’s home as far back as I can remember, and when she passed, it was passed to my mother, and in turn, to me. I had it appraised over 12 years ago for $350.00. The appraiser said it was a water color, circa 1920. It is a lake scene.

  6. Sharon McKinstry says:

    I own a Chandler landscape of a church. It was my grandparents, passed to my mother and now to me. Would a local authority (at Duke, or the NC Museum of Art) be able to value this piece?

    Thanks! Sharon

  7. Steven Chandler says:

    Mike, I am thrilled that you’ve posted the information you were able to dig up about Chandler and his company. The only thing I could learn years ago is that he and his brother formed the company. I was also told that W.H. was the artist but hired others to produce work for him and his brother oversaw the framing aspects for the company. Is this accurate? I was also told they were from Massachusetts but I learned from you research that they were from NY.

    I am fortunate to have (3) Chandler pastels; one is a 24×18″ lake scene with a cabin, sailboats and beautiful soft landscape; one is a 10×20″ landscape with a stream falling over rocks and the style is clearly different with a heavier application of pastel; the third is a large 18×40″ horizontal seascape of a large sailboat in center with two smaller boats in distance, on moonlight water.

    As an artist myself, secretly I had hoped I was related to them until I learned that they were born in New York. My Chandlers come into Massachusetts in 1638 and stayed in Mass, CT and Vermont.

    I will look for the booklet, “Chandler-Early American Pastel Artist.”

    Thank you for your research.

    • Mike Wilcox Mike Wilcox says:

      While not mass produced in the modern sense of the term, they were made in fairly large numbers which keeps their values still fairly modest. One sees them on Ebay from time to time, which gives you an idea as to the numbers available

      Mike Wilcox

      • mike vergamini says:

        penny, i have a chandler pastel for sale. a road show told me i have a very rare early work of chandler valued at 25,000 to 50,000 dollars. if your interested call me at 315 568 9645. it’s of a sail boat in the water.

  8. penny smith says:

    I have a print of chandler. “Queen Anne Cottage” 1895
    Do you know how common the prints are? I would love to find more!

    • james stone says:

      hi penny,
      I finaly found another owner of queen anne’s cottage. I
      wasn’t sure about the sigature. Mine is old and in bad
      shape but I put it in a nicer frame. We love it. Get back if
      you get more news about about it’s value etc.
      Thanks Jim Stone

    • james stone says:

      Hi penny
      Get back to me Regarding queen anne’s cottage.
      Thanks Jim Stone

  9. Tom says:

    We just found that same print that was behind another in the frame. Being covered, the colors are still vibrant.

    We are interested in it also.

  10. Jerry Kirsch Chandler says:

    I own two still life Chandler pastels. The larger one was photographed by someone at the Smithsonian when I took it to an “Antiques Roadshow-Type-Happening” in Lancaster, PA.

    Someone from Ohio contacted me after contacting the Smithsonian, so I don’t know if the Smithsonian can add to your information.

    I was under the impression that they were done by someone in Lancaster County, but after reading your information, I believe they were probably done by the W.H. Chandler company. It would be helpful if you put one with the signature on this page so owners could compare theirs with the signature on the ones you researched.

    Thanks for doing this work.

  11. steve adams says:

    i have a painting of a waterwheel millhouse i am not sure what it is called but it has been in our house as long as i can remember 40 years? can you give me any info on it? it is sighed chandler

  12. Jack Berkle says:

    Yes, the really well executed,large and or rare scenes can sell for many thousands. check out the http://www.pastelmaster.com to see some beauties. Only wish mine were that nice….

    Jack B.

  13. Dennis Hood says:

    We have a 18 x 24 approx. print done in ink that features a hunter type with rifle standing beside a lady by a stream. There are some cows in the near background. It has been in my wife’s family for many years. It is signed simply Chandler.

    Any information on this one?

  14. Des Cummins says:

    I received a “CHANDLER” oil painting well over 30 years ago as a gift. It’s a forest scene with a river running through the centre with trees on both sides, including embankments. Its size is 32”x16” (81cmx40cm). I often wondered about its history and came across your site. Appreciate any information, regarding its history and value etc.,

  15. Melody says:

    Hi, I have just been given a painting by my aunt, it is a moon picture over looking the lake,
    it is about 8″ width and about 19-20″ long,
    just wondered if you know what year it would have been done, and how much it would be worth
    thank you

  16. terry dean says:

    I inherited a chandler signed pastel of a winter night setting. subject of a blacksmith’s shop with brilliant orange lite emitting from the shop door onto a snowy trail…backdropped with a crescent moon and trees with buildings in the distance…one cannot take their eyes from this painting. I’d like to know more about this artist…no initial just Chandler….this painting was owned by a 90 yr. old veterinarian from nebr. and my Mom aquired it in the early 90′s….thank you

    • thank you very much for this info. I have been very curious about this picture which has been in my family for the past 90 years. It is quite large 22×44 and was framed by my grandfather circa 1920 he was a photographer. I had all these years assumed it was an English scene. It is a lake scene, small mountains a waterfall with sailboats in the distance.

  17. Pat says:

    Mike,
    I recently was looking at an old picture frame that belonged to my Grandmother and behind the pictures in the frame was a Chandler print entitled Rough Winding Hills and simply signed Chandler. I came upon your article when I did the a search on Chandler. I could not find anything in regards to this print online. Do you have any information on this print?
    Pat

    • Hi Pat,
      I have the same exact painting that has been in my family for over 100 years. Did you find out anthing on the painting. I am curious!

    • Mike Wilcox says:

      As far as I know there is no definitive reference material about Chandler or a complete catalog of his production to search out individual titles. All one can do is check auction records for past sales based on the artist’s name and title of the work.

  18. Mary Payne says:

    The painting I have has been in the family for at least 100 years. It is a winter country scene with horsae sled with passangers crossing a country bridge coming up to an old farm house. Colors are very calming, nostalgic and I love it. It is in an original frame-white with gold colored embellishments. I would love to get some information on it. Thanks. Mary

  19. Oiuda Craft says:

    I think I have a lithograph by Chandler. It is a picture of a lady and man in a row boat in a stream surrounded by trees. There is a full moon. It is signed Chandler. It is in an old picture frame. If you could give me any information on this, I would be most appreciative.

  20. penny wilson says:

    I went to an auction about 10 years ago,and purchased a Chandler print. There were 2 reasons I was drawn to this print.#1 My son that passed away name was Chandler and #2 my dad that passed away 2 years before my son, had sheep on his farm. I love this print could you tell me more about it It was signed by Chandler in the left hand corner Thanks Penny Wilson

    • Mike Wilcox says:

      Quite often artists are ” Unknowns”, meaning they were hobbyists and not professionals, or their work never really developed a following. In such case there is often not any biographical or auction records available. In the case of any artist I check sources such as askart.com, findartinfo.com or liveauctioneers.com under the artist’s name and then go from there.

  21. shawn s says:

    I have a medium small landscape painting from about the late forties early fifties it is signed G Chantler. When I typed the search only CHANDLER came up. Do you know anything about G. CHANTLER??

  22. Anne Marie says:

    The Chandler pastel my husband and I have belonged to my late in-laws and I expect they purchased it in Chicago. I have not had it appraised but the canvas was cut to the beautiful rounded edge frame. It is an evening setting of a camper by a fireside ashore a river with rapids. The painting itself appears to be 18 x 40. Its beautiful. I cannot believe it is only worth $500 or less. Certainly worth more to my husband and me.

  23. Karen J says:

    Check out the book, The Power of Pastels by June Rhode. She has backround information, pictures of signatures, and photos of artwork by Chandler, Gunderson, Glatthaar, etc. Very informative if you are interested in pastels or chalks as they are also called.

  24. erica thompson says:

    i just purchased a oil painting (i think its oil) but its black and white painting of the moonlit seascape with seagulls flying in the air, and the waves breaking. the signature is signed chandler at the bottom right. i hear so much about chandler’s pastels and have heard that there were some oil painting done by him i just wondered if he ever did black and white seascapes. just wanted to check if it was really w h chandler. thanks

    • Mike Wilcox says:

      Erica,

      I’m not aware of any black & white seascapes by Chandler. There’s probably hundreds of other artists out there that share the same last name, “Chandler”

      • Tom says:

        Great info Mike: I have a similar painting as described of the lit surf with several gulls flying above the froth. This one is vertcal and is in color with suitably muted blues and light pink in the sky breaking through and opening in dark clouds. Reminds me of the ocean at first light.

        Within the frame is 11 by 15 and “Chandler” quite clear in the lower right. Nice thin gold border to half inch angled white canvas white to a golden hued wood final frame.

        Would love to know what you think. Thanks in advance,

        Tom

      • erica says:

        i do have another painting very similar to the pastels i have seen signed by W.H. Chandler but this on does not have a signature. the frame is very old and when i took the art work out of the frame ( gently) i searched under a mag glass to see the colors in more detail. the canvas it was dont on look very very fragile so i gently put it back in to place. its definitely done in a pastel water based or chalky substance. i did not find a signature on it. could there be a sister piece that is suppose to match it that was signed? will be happy to send photos via email address. thanks

  25. mary lou says:

    i have a chandler painting that i would like to find out infomation about. its a farm with cows in the front and have only the name of the painter on it. if u could help me please.

  26. Mike Wilcox says:

    There’s not much left to be said that has not been covered already in the comments made here. I can only suggest checking out the book, The Power of Pastels by June Rhode. As far as I know there is not a definitive listing of all Chandler pastels.

  27. Barb Black says:

    Thank you for that extremely interesting article on Chandler paintings. It took some time to locate who I felt was the artist of a very beautiful 20 x 18 pastel that I have of a winter scene of a log cabin in the woods with a sunset in the background and a team of horses pulling a sleigh with a man and woman riding in the sleigh and a gentleman standing in the lane behind as they were leaving the cabin. The pastel was signed by the name Chandler only in the lower part of the picture. Just wondering from your write up of W. H. Chandler and Co. if the artists were all part of the Chandler family. The quality of the work is amazing. I am not sure where it was framed but it has a lovely 5″ molded gold frame which really sets the picture off nicely. Was wondering if there is somewhere that one could view some of these paintings by Chandler.

    • Mike Wilcox says:

      Hi Barb,

      As far as I’m aware all the work from Chandler’s company was the work of Hired Artists and not family members. Most of the Chandler pastels I’ve viewed have been on auction sites such as liveauctioneers.com . New examples appear every month on such auction sites, you could also check Worthpoints Worthepedia, it covers about the largest range of items sold at auction and online you’ll find anywhere.

  28. Heidi says:

    My husband and I just purchased a Chandler at an antique store down the road from us. They had it labeled as a print behind glass, but it’s actually a pastel. A little bit of the pastel is on the glass. It is a campfire scene with a woman looking out at a lake. We have no idea what it’s worth but we paid $73 for it including tax. It’s beautiful and we love it.

    • Mike Wilcox says:

      Well, you made a good deal Heidi. This past year at auction even the smaller Chandlers often sell for about twice what you paid.

  29. Lee Hockridge says:

    I have a signed Chandler with a very old tag on the back that reads 1893 lito…it is of 2 log cabins..one on each side of a brook in the winter time large picture in a very old frame…signed Chandler in the lower left corner…Value?

    • Mike Wilcox says:

      You’d have to use our “Ask a Worthologist” service to get a detailed response to your request for a valuation on individual pieces of art. You will have to provided deatiled images of your piece and any markings on it in your valuation request.

  30. I have a Chandler wintery painting with a church with a house next to it pickett fence around it and theres a small pond with rocks around the pond. There are people walking down the snowy street and theres a moon in the painting.

    • Germaine Morse says:

      I believe i have a lithograph of the same picture. It is in a beautiful raised (embossed) embellished frame and the really strange thing was , when the glass broke during a move , we found an original charcoal signed by Chandler of a dog called “Ned” behind the litho.

      • Carl says:

        I have a church scene with a large stepple in front and a very small stepple in back with a rickety fence next to a stone house with chimney, two windows in front and two on side with pine trees, moon in back ground with people walking down a snowy street. The snow on the church roof sparkles. Is this also a lithograph? It is also signed Chandker in a raised embossed gold frame.

  31. Markola says:

    Hi: I have a Chandler painting. It has two people in a horse carriage, going a cross a snow bridge to a beautiful house on the hill. It was given to me by my father and he said either his mother or his grandmother owned it. It is a beautiful painting and I now have it hanging in my house. Do you have any idea what the value of this painting might be.

    Markola McLaughlin

  32. Germaine Morse says:

    I just rechecked the original Dog charcoal and it is signed F.F.Chandler,1888. William’s Brother!

  33. Mike Wilcox says:

    To all those requesting values for their Chandlers, their value depends a great deal on the size and subject matter.
    for a general overview here’s a link to Chandler’s sold at auction since 2004:

    http://www.liveauctioneers.com/search?q=Chandler+pastel&hasimage=true&dtype=gallery&type=complete&rows=20

  34. Scott Price says:

    How can you tell whether you have a print or original. Even tho the paper backing it brittle the majority is intact. Must I have to remove the paper and wood backing to determine this?

    Thanks,

    Scott

    • greg says:

      Mary,

      I have a book coming out on Chandler in the next few months. It will be the only book ever about Chandler soley.

      I have only seen three oil paintings that I was certain were chandlers.They will be featured in my book. I would very much like to see a photo of your painting. Could you please send me a photo to belmontproperties@charter.net

      Regards

      Greg

  35. mary celello says:

    I have a painting on canvas of fruit on a table it is signed chandler it is in a very old ornate wood frame. We have had it over 50 years and my grandfather who was a antique collector got it at a estate sale any idea of the value

    • Mike Wilcox says:

      Chandler’s main output was pastels and not oil paintings, though it is recorded they did produce some oils, watercolors and charcoal drawings. There is of course the huge possibility that the Chandler that painted your piece was someone other than William Henry Chandler or his associates.

      With most oil paintings they really require the services of a Fine Arts Appraiser and a physical examination of the painting to determine the value and origins.

  36. Lynne Cason says:

    Hi Mike,
    I went on your advice to the website http://www.liveauctioneers.com (web address previously given by you and much much more complete). I had to create an account to see what each piece sold for.

    I was surprised to see most of the artwork had sold for anywhere from $30 to $250, with a few pieces being in that range and most of them ranging under $200. The $30 painting had a beautiful frame and was lovely. To me the frame was worth more than the selling price. Is this because Galleries mostly are the ones that buy them and they can turn them around and make a little more mone?

    Can you tell us a better place to find a good idea of better prices, like retail prices, not wholesale prices? I bought my lovely Chandler from a friend 20 years ago for about $125. I’d hoped not to lose money on it if I do sell it.

    Also, can you tell me why some landscapes that look just as lovely and seem similar in sizes have such different ranges as one for $30, one for $90, One for $75, one for $150, ect and so forth?

    This website was very discouraging.

    Thanks for any advice or comments to this,
    Lynne

  37. Mike Wilcox says:

    Hi Lynne, I generally only quote auction prices because retail prices in the Secondary Art market are often highly inflated, but then discounted for sale. Part of the reason the Chandlers are so modestly priced is simple economics, they were made in large numbers and a great many still survive. You could use our Worthopedia to determine both wholesale and retail values at http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia or search our sister site http://www.goantiques.com

  38. tim osha says:

    The live auction results for Chandler’s painting are highly misleading. Yes, there were a lot of chandlers created but the really well executed uncommon scenes bring into the thousands on Ebay and privately.I have seen many sell into the thousands and have purchased several well into the thousands. Many of the pieces you see on http://www.pastelmasters.com are very rare and unique and masterfully executed. They are very valuable.

    So I would not judge the value of your painting by what you see from live auction results with regard to chandler.

    • Mike Wilcox says:

      There are exceptions to every rule, for virtually any item, for example, old Mason/fruit jars jars. The vast majority of them sell by the case all the time for less than a box of new ones, but “Rare” ones have sold at auction for $25,000. The fact remains though, the rare ones are the exception and not the rule. Auctions values are used as part of that process by all Appraisers

      Auction values for fine art and prints is not misleading, the vast majority of art work sells through auctions and gives a baseline wholesale value. If 350 Chandlers, or any other artist’s work for that matter, sells in a given year you will get a range of their works in varying size and quality. If the highest value at auction for a Chandler work is $1000.00, the market has determined the vast majority of them will sell for less than that at auction, retailing for whatever mark up a gallery or dealer thinks they can get away with.

      If the median value for a Chandler’s of a given subject matter over the last three years at auction is $250.00 and and only one example sold for over $1000.00, it’s highly unlikely many are going to retail for over $1000.00, some will, but they will be in the minority.

      This precisely why art work requires an appraisal, to determine if you have an average piece or that 1 in 5,000 rare example.

  39. tim osha says:

    The problem with what you say is that the true market for chandler, and this may be unique, is private galleries and Ebay. It is true that high priced chandlers,which are his finest works, are not that plentiful.

    I have been tracking Chandler on Ebay for ten years and have found works , that have sold for two and over three thousand dollars. But these works are not often available for sale. They are uncommon and rare. But the 1000.00 high price for a chandler in live auction records is certainly misleading as an actual high price.
    But it is true that there are many common and even damaged scenes that just do not sell for high prices.

    Regards

    Tim Osha, Curator, Pastel Masters Museum Gallery

  40. wesley says:

    I have a chandler painting titled a winter sunset in new england copyrighted in 1895. I can not find anything about this painting not even a pic or another print online. I would like to find out everything about it. If anyone has any info I would appreciate it much, thank you.

    • Mike Wilcox Mike Wilcox says:

      There’s not much left to be said that has not been covered already in the comments made here. I can only suggest checking out the book, The Power of Pastels by June Rhode. As far as I know there is not a definitive listing of all Chandler pastels.

    • Tim Osha says:

      Wesley

      What you have is not a chandler painting. It is an original Chandler print. Prints , in good condition with no damage and with a very nice ornate frame have been sold for as much as 300.00 and as little as 75.00 generally speaking.

      Your particular print was one of the many sold by the Chandler Studio from the late 1800’s up until 1928.

      Tim Osha, Curator, Pastel Masters Museum Gallery

  41. Verla says:

    Did anyone other than Chandler himself sign his pastels?

    • Mike Wilcox Mike Wilcox says:

      I have no information one way or the other regarding his signature. Thousands of these pastels were produced, as far as I know nobody has verified a signature being his or that of one of his staff.

    • Tim Osha says:

      There is no positive proof that Chandler did not sign all of his works of art. Many came out of his studio unsigned and perhaps they were not chandlers works.

      Vera

      There are some differences in signatures, signatures which appear on legitimate paintings from the Chandler studio. It is also true that chandler suffered a bad gun shot injury at some point which may have affected his ability to write. But again, we will never know for sure and there are no records of the Chandler studio.

      Gregory Kojoyian , a noted Chandler collector from Boston Ma, has a book coming out in the coming months which will address many of the questions here and which will showcase many of chandlers best works and his prints and examples of his signature. . I look forward to that publication.

      Tim Osha

  42. Mike Wilcox Mike Wilcox says:

    As far as I’m aware of, if it’s a Chandler, it will be signed. The only other possibility is if was cut to fit an existing frame, the signature could be cut off when trimmed to fit the frame.

  43. Sarah says:

    I just found a picture with a gold leaf frame, signed Chandler. This is a horse drawn sleigh, with a man and woman in the sleigh, on a snowy evening (house in the back ground). How would I go about finding it’s value? (I recently bought a home with a lot of history).

    Many thanks in advance!

    • Mike Wilcox Mike Wilcox says:

      You’d have to use our “Ask a Worthologist” service to get a detailed response to your request for a valuation on individual pieces of art. You will have to provided detailed images of your piece and any markings on it in your valuation request.

    • Tim Osha says:

      Sahah

      you also have a chandler painting. Again, it is an original Chandler print. Prints , in good condition with no damage and with a very nice ornate frame have been sold for as much as 300.00 and as little as 75.00 generally speaking.

      Your particular print was one of the many sold by the Chandler Studio from the late 1800’s up until 1928.

      Tim Osha, Curator, Pastel Masters Museum Gallery

    • Tim Osha says:

      You also have an original Chandler print. Prints , in good condition with no damage and with a very nice ornate frame have been sold for as much as 300.00 and as little as 75.00 generally speaking.

      Your particular print was one of the many sold by the Chandler Studio from the late 1800’s up until 1928.

      Tim Osha, Curator, Pastel Masters Museum Gallery

  44. Richard Brubaker says:

    I recently purchased a pastel print signed Chandler. The subject is cows in a stream with trees on either side and a boat. In the far back is a pasture with a few more cows lying down and a farmstead. The painting does not fill the entire canvas but fades to the edges. Most Chandler prints that I have seen filled the entire canvas. Can you help me understand what I may have purchased?

    • Mike Wilcox Mike Wilcox says:

      Richard, some Chandler pastoral scenes use the faded edge, they are not considered unusual or rare, I’ve the one you are referring to sell for less than $50.00 at auction.

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