Start free trial

Home > News, Articles & Multimedia > Blog Entry > The Collector’s Minute: Dutch Delft Pottery Charger

The Collector’s Minute: Dutch Delft Pottery Charger

by Mike Wilcox (07/05/10).


This Dutch Delft plate was made by PZH (Plateelbakkerij Zuid-Holland), which was founded in the town of Gouda in South-Holland (Zuid-Holland) in 1898.

This Dutch Delft plate was made by PZH (Plateelbakkerij Zuid-Holland), which was founded in the town of Gouda in South-Holland (Zuid-Holland) in 1898.

This is an example of a Dutch Delft pottery charger, designed to be hung as a decorative wall plate. Most such wall plates measure more than 13 inches across, with some reaching as much as 20 inches in diameter. This particular piece measures approximately 17 inches across.

Delft blue and white pottery first appeared in the 1500s, but it wasn’t until the 1740s that the production, makers and their marks were well recorded. Very few companies went without using very distinctive marks for their pieces. Decorative wall plates like this one were made mainly for the export and tourist markets after the First World War, and again after World War Two. While not mass produced in the modern sense of the term, they were produced in very large numbers, of which many have survived to this day.

This particular plate was made by PZH (Plateelbakkerij Zuid-Holland), which was founded in the town of Gouda in South-Holland (Zuid-Holland) in 1898. The company used quite a variety of marks, artists’ marks and date marks. The central marking used by Zuid Holland that looks like a house is actually a gate—specifically the “Gate of Lazarus”—once the stone doorway of the old leper infirmary (around 1609) in the town of Gouda in Zuid Holland. The date mark on the left corner of the gate that looks like a dagger was used for 1953, the mark to the right of the gate that looks like a musical note is the decorator’s monogram marking (unfortunately, this decorator is unknown). The PZH Zuid-Holland factory closed in 1964.

The marks on the back of the plate, which have been in use since the 1740s, show the production, maker’s and decorator’s marks

The marks on the back of Delft plates have been regulated since the 1740s, the Zuid-Holland marks show the pattern, date and decorator’s marks.

In the current market, comparable Delft chargers sell in the $120-$160 range.

Mike Wilcox, of Wilcox & Hall Appraisers, is a Worthologist who specializes in Art Nouveau and the Arts and Craft movement.

——————————

WorthPoint—Discover Your Hidden Wealth

Join WorthPoint on Twitter and Facebook.

Want a picture icon with your comment? Sign up with Gravatar to get one.

Leave a Reply