German World War II Art Published as Waffen SS-Approved Postcards

Postcard A14 “Two Man Post of the Waffen SS,” by artist Gebhardt-Westernbuchberg, was a postcard in the Austellung Deutsche Kuenstler und die SS postcard series, produced in 1944. Numbered on the back (A2884).

The German artists and the SS exhibition catalog cover. The postcard series Austellung Deutsche Kuenstler und die SS has its origins in an exhibition held under the same name in Salzburg in June and July of 1944.

The postcard series Austellung Deutsche Kuenstler und die SS has its origins in an exhibition held under the same name in Salzburg (formerly in Austria) in June and July of 1944. It is a continuation of the propaganda campaign that produced the Deutsche Kuenstler und Die SS series, which is covered in another article. As with the earlier series, some of the art is from Waffen SS war reporters, while others are from nonmilitary artists. The images run from graphic portrayals of soldiers, combat and military images to pastoral and Germanic themes.

The catalogue contains 20 images, most of which are not shown in the publication, from the Deutsche Kuenstler und Die SS series. It contains a complete listing of the exhibition halls, what artists and specific art are displayed in each room of the halls, and what medium the art is (i.e., oil, watercolor, bronze, etc.). This publication is very difficult to find.

Postcard A02 “Motorcycle Messenger,” by artist Otto Engelhardt-Kyffhäuser. Numbered on the back (A2872),

Postcard A12 “In the Studio,” by Oskar Martin Amorbach. Numbered on the back (A2882).

We believe there are 14 cards in the series. Our belief is based on a sequential numbering system and the assumption that the first and last cards in the sequence are already known. Only 11 have been found to date.

Images for all 11 known cards, both front and back, can be found in the book “Postcards of the Waffen SS Services cards.” This book has allocated a catalogue number, A01 through A14, for each postcard, even for the unknown cards, based on the gaps in the card numbering shown on the backs. These numbers are used when referencing the cards in this article.

Postcard A09 “In the Stall,” by artist Woldemar Keller-Küehne. Numbered on the back (A2879).

: Postcard A09 “In the Stall,” reverse. Typical for all postcards. The cards are printed on a good-quality cream-base photographic stock with letterpress printing in black on the reverse.

These cards appear to have been produced in early 1944 but never issued. None have so far been seen used. There appears to have been only one printing by the firm Friedrich Franz Bauer G.m.b.H in Berlin, under the license from the SS Main Office in Berlin. The postcards are all a standard size of 4.2 by 5.9 inches (10.4 by 14.8 cm). They are printed on a good-quality cream-base photographic stock with letterpress printing in black on the reverse. The fonts used include Gothic for the two-line series title; Times for the artist, title and SS office text, and an early sans serif for the publisher/center dividing text. There is a printer’s mark in the lower right corner of the card that appears as “M/1293 h0.” Condition of the cards is usually excellent, as they appear not to have been issued.

Pricing is based on cards in very good+ to excellent condition. Prices for cards used before the end of the war should be significantly higher. These cards are not known to have been forged/reproduced up to this time. The prices for the cards in this series do not have the same range as the “Deutsche Kuenstler” of the previous article.

Postcard A01 “Departure,” Segment from a mural by artist Herbert Dippmann. Numbered on the back (A2871).

An official press photo of the exhibition of German War Art in Rome. Behind the officials is an original painting that appears as an image on postcard A02 in this series.

The total range is from $15 to about $65. This mainly has to do with theme and desirability. That being said, should any of the cards not currently known be discovered, and be offered for sale by a person with this knowledge, I would anticipate pricing from $100-$300 each, depending on theme.

The known cards appear in about the same quantities, unlike the “Deutsche Kuenstler.” The cards with military or Waffen SS themes will price at the higher end of the range. The pastoral and non-military related themes will price at the low end of the range. There is a good chance many of the non-military cards can be found as a “sleepers” in some unknowing dealer’s stock.

You can get a feel for the variety of postcards produced by the Waffen SS and the prices they can command by viewing the Worthopedia search for “Waffen SS Postcard.”


Matthew Roth is the owner of MAR Historical and been collecting and selling German Third Reich historical collectibles for more than 30 years. He has also authored several books on German WWII postcards that, along with books by other authors on German Third Rich Stamps and Militaria, have been brought to print by his company MAR Publishing. He lives and works in Broomfield. Colo.

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