Military General Staff Collar Insignia

Aide to the General staff collar insignia
Aide to the General of the Army collar insignia
Aide to the Chief of Staff of the Army collar insignia
Aide to the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army collar insignia
Aide to the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff collar insignia
Aide to the Joint Chiefs of Staff collar insignia
Aide to the Under Secretary of the Army collar insignia
Aide to the Secretary of the Army collar insignia
Aide to the Secretary of Defense collar insignia
Aide to the Vice President of the United States collar insignia
Aide to the President of the United States collar insignia

The U.S. military, like any military around the world, identifies its military specialties by uniquely designed patches, ribbons, badges, pins and other items.

Below are the general staff and higher rank collar insignia as described by the U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry:

President of the United States: A blue shield bearing a circle of 13 white stars supporting a gold eagle displayed, wings inverted, 1 1/4 inch height overall. Prior to 1946, there was no prescribed insignia for Aides to the President of the United States. In 1946, an insignia was adopted — 48 stars in a ring on a shield surmounted by an eagle. This design was changed in 1953 to 13 white stars on a blue shield surmounted by an eagle.

Vice President of the United States: A white shield bearing a circle of 13 blue stars supporting a gold eagle displayed, wings inverted, 1 1/4 inch height overall. The insignia for Aides to the Vice President of the United States was approved on 24 January 1969.

The Secretary of Defense: On a blue shield, 3/4 inches in height, surmounted by a gold color eagle displayed with wings reversed ½ inch in height, three crossed arrows in gold color between four white enameled stars (two and two).

The insignia for Aides to the Secretary of Defense was approved in August 1948. The three crossed arrows are of the style on the Department of Defense Seal. Four stars are commonly used on positional flags for secretarial level positions.

The Secretary of the Army: A red shield surmounted by the Coat of Arms of the United States in gold between four white enameled stars, supporting a gold eagle displayed, wings inverted, 1 1/4 inch height overall. The insignia for aides to the Secretary of the Army was prescribed in Army Regulations of 1948.

Under Secretary of the Army: A white shield surmounted by the Coat of Arms of the United States in gold between four red enameled stars, supporting a gold eagle displayed, wings inverted, 1 1/4 inch height overall. The insignia for aides to the Under Secretary of the Army was approved in 1962.

Chief of Staff of the Army: A shield 3/4 inch in height divided from lower left to upper right, the upper part red and the lower part white, a silver five-pointed star surmounted by the coat of arms of the United States in gold, between two white five-pointed stars at the top and two red five-pointed stars in base, with a gold color eagle with wings reversed, ½ inch in height, placed above the shield.

Vice Chief of Staff of the Army: A shield 3/4 inch in height divided saltirewise, the upper and lower part white and each side red, a silver five-pointed star surmounted by the coat of army of the United States in gold, between two red stars at the top and two red stars at the bottom, with a gold color eagle with wings reversed ½ inch in height place above the shield.

Prior to 1963, Aides to the Chief of Staff wore the same insignia as aides to other generals. On 25 April 1963, the present design of insignia for aide to the Chief of Staff was approved. Aides to the Vice-Chief continued to wear the same insignia as aides to other generals. On 10 June 1987, the insignia for aide to the Vice Chief of Staff was approved.

Joint Chiefs of Staff: Aide to Chairman: On a shield, 3/4 inch in height divided diagonally from upper left to lower right, the upper part blue and the lower part white, a gold color eagle between two white five pointed stars at the top and two blue five pointed stars at the base, with a gold color metal eagle displayed with wings reversed ½ inch in height placed above the shield.

Aide to Vice Chairman: On a white white shield 3/4 inch in height divided diagonally with a blue center stripe from upper left to lower right, a gold color metal eagle between two five pointed stars at the top and two five pointed stars at the base (blue star on white and white star on blue), with a gold color metal eagle with wings reversed, ½ inch in height, placed above the shield.

The eagle on the shield is of the design of the eagle on the Department of the Defense seal. The background colors are the same as the flag designs for the positions. Light blue is the color normally associated with Department of Defense

General of the Army: A blue shield, 3/4 inch in height, with five white stars arranged in a circle, inner points touching, surmounted above by a gold color eagle displayed with wings reversed ½ inch in height. The insignia for Aides to General of the Army was approved on 15 January 1945.

There were 5 modern day Generals of the Army; Omar Bradley, Douglas McArthur, George C. Marshall, Dwight Eisenhower, and Henry ‘Hap’ Arnold. A predecessor rank of General of the Army had four stars, then two stars with an eagle in between created in 1866 for Ulysses S. Grant, but retired in 1888. No officers currently hold the rank of General of the Army.

General Staff: A shield, ¾ inch in height surmounted by a gold color eagle displayed with wings reversed ½ inch in height; the chief of the shield is blue with silver stars reflecting the grade of the general officer the aide is serving, and 13 vertical stripes, 7 silver and 6 red. The insignia was approved in 1902.