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Patches of the Office of Vice President of the United States

by Tom Carrier (02/25/08).
Security staff at the St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington, DC using the coat-of-arms of the vice president
Presidential Food Service staff using the coat-of-arms of the vice president in their official patch
Western White House patch in Crawford, TX using the coat-of-arms of the Vice President, not known if official or commercially produced for resale
Patch of the Vice President, pre-1975, unofficial or commercial version, should not have 50 stars surrounding it
Patch of the Vice President, 1975 to present, 'bouillon' patch of woven gold and silver wire
Patch of the Vice President, 1975 to present, Secret Service
Patch of the Vice President, pre-1975, Secret Service

The seal of the vice president was created by Executive Order 10016 on November 10, 1948 and signed by President Harry S Truman. The Executive Order specifies the design and restrictive use of the seal of the president. That design lasted until it was changed in 1975 by Executive Order 11884 signed by President Gerald Ford.

In the years since, there haven’t been many of the vice presidential agencies from governmental to military utilizing the vice presidential seal or eagle to differentiate its role in serving the office of vice president of the United States. Of the few distinctive patches known, I’ve included here.

Naturally, there are more and you are welcome to include the patches that you may have found as well.

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