• 7
    Jun

Auctions 101: A Beginners Guide to the Auction House

Going to live auctions is an exciting experience. It’s fun, fast-paced, educational and arguably the best source for bargains. It can be, however, very daunting—especially if it is your first time. My first live auction was much like the first time I walked into a casino. I wasn’t sure of protocol; I was uncomfortable betting […]

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  • 25
    Jan

Getting a Handle on Collecting Antique Walking Sticks

Walking sticks, or canes as they are sometimes known, have been in the hands of man since he first walked the earth. Since then, walking sticks have been used for both practicality and decoration throughout history. King Tut had more than a hundred buried with him to accompany him in the afterlife. King Louis XIV […]

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  • 7
    Sep

Which Came First: Current Mid-Century Modern Enthusiasm or ‘Mad Men’?

If you, too, are mad about the popular AMC TV drama “Mad Men”—about the men (and women) who work for a Madison Avenue advertising firm in the early 1960s—it’s likely you’ve noticed the furnishings and style of the homes, offices and places the characters visit. That’s mid-century modern you’re looking at, and it’s not just […]

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  • 26
    Apr

Ask A Worthologist Question: Carl Kauba Bronze

Jarvis C. sent a question in to WorthPiont’s “Ask a Worthologist” service, writing: “This piece belonged to my grandfather and over the years it was always referred to as the ‘Remington bronze.’ Being that it sat on top of a rather tall book case for at least 30 years, I never really examined it until […]

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  • 26
    Apr

What Makes ‘Auction Wally’ Tick, Pick?

Walt Kolenda is a busy man, indeed. Probably better known as “Auction Wally,” Kolenda has turned his love for and knowledge of auctions, antiques and appraisals into a highly successful—and enjoyable—business. Born and reared in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Kolenda now makes his home in Barre, Mass., where he hosts a radio show, publishes a newsletter, […]

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  • 20
    Apr

Where’s Will? Postcards from the Edge of the Collecting World

COLUMBUS, Ohio – There has been a spirited conversation in the comment sections of some of our WorthPoint articles about whether collecting is in danger of dying out because younger people do not collect. It is my belief that yes, there are young collectors, and no, collecting is not dying. First I have to laughingly try […]

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  • 20
    Apr

Long-Legged Lovelies: Steiff’s Iconic Lulac-Style Animals

The Steiff Company has always been a pioneer in the toy industry. Steiff is best known for creating the first jointed Teddy bear in 1902, but the company’s list of other achievements is quite long and impressive. For example, did you know that the company produced and sold nearly one million Teddy bears in 1907, […]

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  • 19
    Apr

The Press Back – The Art of Chair Decoration without Carving

The carving of 17th-century “Sunflower” chests explains a lot about the ins and outs of New England Colonial carving of the time. They highlight the real world priorities of the period and the fact that decorating an otherwise perfectly fine plain chest was a luxury that few could afford to buy or had the time […]

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  • 19
    Apr

Ask A Worthologist Question: Currier & Ives Print

John S. had what he believed to be an antiqueCurrier & Ives print, but didn’t know much more than what was printed at the bottom of the image. He didn’t know if it was an original or a copy, but he was hoping it was the former. He engaged WorthPoint’s “Ask a Worthologist” service, and […]

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  • 13
    Apr

Furniture Labels: Telling the Makers, Retailers and Associations Apart

Furniture making in America in the 19th century ranged from the small shop, like that of Duncan Phyfe in downtown New York at the turn of the century, to the huge factories of Grand Rapids and Buffalo at the turn of the next century. Phyfe was one of the rare early century cabinetmakers who actually […]

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