• 23
    Sep

Q & A with Harry Rinker: Marwal Bull, Reed and Barton Bells, Heisey Syrup Pitcher

QUESTION: I own a large plaster of Paris sculpture of a bull that is painted dark brown. An impressed oval-stamp with “MARWAL / IND / INC” in its border is located near the right rear leg of the bull. When was this sculpture made? What is its value? – LR, Titusville, FL ANSWER: An Internet […]

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  • 25
    Aug

German-made Jasperware: Easy to Find & Underappreciated

“Jasperware” was originally developed by Josiah Wedgwood during the mid 1700’s. The Wedgwood company was one of the most innovative companies of its time, and often its popular lines were copied by other potteries based in Staffordshire, England and in Europe. This particular piece, like many late 19th century examples by Wedgwood’s Continental imitators, is […]

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  • 18
    Aug

Q & A with Harry Rinker: Royal Winton, Baffle Ball, Blenko Vase

QUESTION: I inherited a luncheon set consisting of six plates, six cups and saucers, teapot, creamer, and sugar, in Royal Winton’s Cheadle pattern. What is its value? – B, Lehigh Valley, PA ANSWER: Leonard Lumsden Grimwade, a modeler, founded the Elgin Pottery in Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent in 1885. His older brother Sidney joined the firm shortly […]

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  • 10
    Aug

Expert Appraisers Miss ‘Great Find’ Hiding in Plain Sight

Just as the everyday collector hopes to come across a Great Find—an item bypassed by many, purchased for a pittance and worth thousands—experts can miss a valuable item staring them in the face. Will Seippel, the founder, CEO and president of WorthPoint, recently had such an experience. Will wanted to attend a private estate sale […]

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  • 23
    Jun

Sèvres: The History of Porcelain Fit for a King

There is a porcelain factory in France that in 1752 was designated as the Manufacture Royale de Porcelaine de France. France, no longer being a monarchy, there is no longer a “Royale” aspect to its name, nevertheless the Sèvres factory continues to produce porcelains fit for a king. The town of Sèvres (pronounced “sev” with […]

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  • 23
    Jun

Rinker on Collectibles: What Does Bankruptcy Mean To Collectors?

The early January 2009 announcement that Waterford Wedgwood PLC is entering receivership, the British form of bankruptcy, is the latest indication the traditional 20th century ceramic industry is facing difficult challenges in the 21st century. In addition to Waterford and Wedgwood, the group also owns the Hutschenreuther, Johnson Brothers, Rosenthal, and Royal Doulton trademarks. Hutschenreuther […]

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  • 19
    May

The Origin of Royal Doulton Porcelain

Porcelain and china firms usually take their names from the company’s founder. In 1815, John Doulton became a partner with a widow named Martha Jones—whose late husband had originally founded Lambeth Pottery—and the foreman of the pottery, John Watts. The pottery operation began its new incarnation as Jones, Watts, and Doulton, but would became best […]

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  • 27
    Apr

One Cottage Industry Whose Wares Have Proved Timeless

Over the last few years collecting cottages, especially those made by the company Dept. 56—such as the Original Snow Village and the Dickens Village—as well as the sculptured English homes made by David Winter, have become some of the hottest new collectibles. This collecting of cottages is far from being a new phenomenon, however. As […]

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  • 8
    Apr

Art of the Glaze: Collecting North Carolina Art Pottery

By A. Everette James, Jr. (All items shown in this article are availabe for purchase through GoAntiques.com. Click on the photos for individual item details) For almost any acquisition endeavor, knowledge is power; whether one is collecting old masters, Oriental carpets, raw land in the South Pacific or the XYZ Corp. Ltd. However, if the […]

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  • 23
    Mar

The Main Types of Under-Glaze Decorations in Japanese Porcelain

There are five main types of under-glaze decoration that were used in the Arita kilns: Blue and white, sometsuke in Japanese; Iron pigment, tetsue in Japanese; a copper-based glaze, shinshayu in Japanese; a technique wherein the image is rendered by leaving it impressed into the body of the piece; and using the clear over-glaze as […]

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