• 7
    Oct

It’s All in the Marks: Dating a Wedgwood Jasperware Urn

This covered urn is an example of Wedgwood “Jasperware.” According to its owner, this one was purchased in 1980 at auction; its vintage was not listed in the auction catalog. Jasperware is a very distinctive type of stoneware with ivory/marble-looking appliques of Greek and Roman classical design on a blue, black, pink, brown red or […]

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  • 11
    Sep

The Ups And Downs of Depression-Era Southern California Pottery

When collectors think about California Pottery, they probably picture the vividly colored dishes produced in the golden state during the Great Depression years by the “Big 5”—that would be Bauer, Catalina, Gladding-McBean, Metlox, Pacific, and Vernon Kilns. Colorful pottery used to be a ubiquitous feature of the lifestyle in the southern part of the Golden […]

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  • 18
    Aug

My Blue China: A Lesson in Globalization

Tracing the history of blue-and-white china is a great primer. The very first examples of white earthenware decorated with cobalt appeared in China as early as the ninth century. By the 1500s, they were already being snatched up by orient-obsessed Europeans and imitated with varying degrees of accuracy. Delft, a term often confusingly used to […]

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  • 11
    Aug

Buying and Enjoying Japanese Porcelain & Historic Items; A Collector’s Take

Are you a collector or are you in an accumulating phase? I interviewed Andreas “Andy” Aigner, a program manager for a telecommunications company who lived in Japan in early 2007 and early 2009 for six-month stints, for his take on collecting porcelain. David Pike: Why do you collect? What does ‘the passion of collecting’ mean […]

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  • 3
    Jun

Kintsugi Techniques: A Detailed Look at the Art of Repair

There is a boom going on in the Japanese art of repair called kintsugi. A quick search on the Internet will turn up links to several major exhibitions in the last couple years. This ancient, traditional art is starting some well-deserved attention outside of Japan. As I’ve noted in a previous article, if you are interested […]

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  • 13
    May

The Secret Japanese Art of Kintsugi Brings Beauty to Breakage

Break a favorite antique? Instead of throwing it out or gluing it together, there is an alternative. Kintsugi, a traditional Japanese method of repairing ceramic, glass and other materials, means “gold repair” or “gold joinery.” Kintsugi originated around the 15th century as a replacement for metal staples, the usual repair method of the time. Staples […]

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  • 21
    Apr

9 Hot Collectibles Categories to Consider for Investment Potential

Some collectors consider investment potential when buying antiques and collectibles. While not everyone agrees with this approach, a number of auctioneers and dealers gave their views on items with the most investment potential or that are currently “hot.” Auctioneers generally agree that today’s environment is much different from several years ago. Millennials—those people born between […]

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  • 29
    Jan

A Look at Cincinnati Pottery Before There Was Rookwood

For most antique lovers, the Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati conjures up images of fine ceramics. Great decorators, combined with great glazes gave this art pottery a well-deserved national reputation. Few people know, however, that Cincinnati was also the scene of a thriving ceramic industry long before pottery began to be manufactured on the top of […]

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  • 2
    Dec

‘Thrift Hunter’ Jason T. Smith to Attend Christmas-Themed Tiki Event in SoCal

Jason T. Smith, the star of “Thrift Hunters” and a WorthPoint Worthologist with a penchant for all things tiki, will be bringing dozens of Polynesian-themed items to sell at the International Tiki Marketplace Holiday Edition Saturday, Dec. 6 at Don the Beachcomber in Huntington Beach, Calif. The event—which will feature some 40-plus tiki vendors, live […]

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  • 21
    Jul

Buyer of Chinese ‘Chicken Cup’ Racks up 422 Million American Express Reward Points

Many of us plan our big, monthly purchases with rewards points in mind. Whether they are frequent flyer bonus points, credit card rewards points or another system that offers some kind of prize for spending money with a certain dedicated card, when we are buying big-ticket items, somewhere in the back of our brain we […]

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