• 15 Sep
    2010

The Collector’s Minute: Wedgwood American Views Plates

It might seem strange, but the country that was the largest producer of pottery depicting American heroes of the Revolution, their homes and famous land marks was the one that lost war. From the early 1800s to the 1950s, English potteries churned out thousands of transferware plates depicting scenes of post-Colonial America. The ones we’re […]

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  • 26 Jul
    2010

The Collector’s Minute: Royal Doulton Women’s Suffrage Ink Wells

Every movement in history has its highs and lows captured in the decorative arts of the time, either as heroic statuary and dramatic portraiture to support the cause, or as comic pieces meant to heap ridicule on a cause to diminish it in the eyes of the public. An example of the latter is reflected […]

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  • 5 Jul
    2010

The Collector’s Minute: Dutch Delft Pottery Charger

This is an example of a Dutch Delft pottery charger, designed to be hung as a decorative wall plate. Most such wall plates measure more than 13 inches across, with some reaching as much as 20 inches in diameter. This particular piece measures approximately 17 inches across. Delft blue and white pottery first appeared in […]

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  • 29 Jun
    2010

The Collector’s Minute: Wedgwood Black Basalt

These wine & water ewers are 19th-century Wedgwood pieces in what’s referred to as “black basalt,” a hard, black vitreous stoneware named after the volcanic rock basalt and manufactured by Josiah Wedgwood from about 1768. Wedgwood’s black basalt ware was an improvement on the stained earthenware known as “Egyptian black,” which was made by other […]

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  • 15 Jun
    2010

The Collector’s Minute: Japanese Sumida Ware

Among the strangest pieces to came out of the Orient during the late 19th century are Japanese export pottery called “Sumida ware,” named after their original origins near the Sumida River that flowed by the Asakusa pottery district. This style, with its high-relief decoration, appeared about 1890 and is believed to be the invention of […]

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  • 11 May
    2010

Cincinnati Pottery Before There Was Rookwood

For most antique lovers, the Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati conjures up images of fine ceramics. Great decorators, combined with great glazes gave this art pottery a well-deserved national reputation. Few people know, however, that Cincinnati was also the scene of a thriving ceramic industry long before pottery began to be manufactured on the top of […]

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  • 8 Apr
    2009

Art of the Glaze: Collecting North Carolina Art Pottery

By A. Everette James, Jr. (All items shown in this article are availabe for purchase through GoAntiques.com. Click on the photos for individual item details) For almost any acquisition endeavor, knowledge is power; whether one is collecting old masters, Oriental carpets, raw land in the South Pacific or the XYZ Corp. Ltd. However, if the […]

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  • 26 Dec
    2008

Art Nouveau Weller “Baldwin” Series Umbrella Stand

Every dealer and collector has a soft spot for certain styles and periods of design that is almost a case of love at first sight. In my own case, it was Art Nouveau, a rebirth in design that reigned supreme from about 1895-1910. This Weller “Baldwin” series umbrella stand, with it’s vine like florals and […]

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  • 21 Nov
    2008

Sarreguemines Vaisselle

Sarreguemines Vaisselle

By Sherri Hall-Wilcox

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  • 6 Nov
    2008

Automobilia China Part Two


Automobilia China Part Two

By David Bausch

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