• 2
    Feb

That ‘Doggone’ Rug: How Some Typos can be turned into Collectible Gold

There are times when attention to detail seems to have gone to the dogs. At least, that’s the opinion of Bob Gualtieri, the sheriff of Pinellas County, Fla., who ordered a large green rug from American Floor Mats. The rug was to feature the Sheriff’s Office logo: a black, gold, and blue star emblazoned with […]

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  • 22
    Nov

The Kennedy Half Dollar—A Numismatic Tribute to a Slain President

Amazingly, it has been 50 years today. For many of us, it may be difficult to remember where we were, or what we did yesterday. However young or old, those of us who lived through the afternoon of Nov. 22, 1963, all have vivid memories of where we were, what we were doing, to this […]

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  • 7
    Nov

One of Jesse Owens’ 1936 Olympic Gold Medal to Sell in Online Auction

One of the four gold medals won by U.S. sporting great Jesse Owens at the 1936 Olympics is headed to the auction block. SCP Auctions, which specializes in sports memorabilia, says on its website that the medal will be available in its auction running Nov. 20 through Dec. 7. Owens’s achievements at the 1936 Berlin […]

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  • 4
    Nov

Unloved Antiques: Bronze Commemorative Medals and Coins

Nearly everyone has a bronze commemorative coin or medal kicking about the house. I must have a half dozen or so myself from local events. I have the 125th-anniversary coin of the founding of my town, an academic medal my mother received in 1944 and a Canadian centennial medallion I bought for $2 in 1967. […]

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  • 25
    Oct

The Collector’s Minute: Calendar Medals

Calendar medals are often items of speculation, and they’re frequently though to be one-of-a-kind, rare presentation pieces. But like paper calendars, they only appear rare because they were often discarded once their useful life was over. Some were made as perpetual calendars, others with a 28-year cycle. For this reason, they’ve been kept around as […]

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  • 15
    May

Collecting the Royals: Kings, Queens and Pretenders to the Throne

There seems to be a lot of abdicating going around. First, Pope Benedict XVI stepped down as Supreme Pontiff (a kind of monarchy), the first reigning Pope to do so in 600 years. Then Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, who was on the throne for only 33 years, abdicated in favor of her eldest son, […]

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  • 13
    Apr

Use A Coin, Go to Jail: The Monneron Medal of Confidence

By Gerald Tebben Trade tokens tend to be simple affairs that make do for money in times of economic stress. During the French Revolution, though, nothing less than fine engraving, exactingly struck on large planchets would do. When Monneron Brothers’ Paris banking house created its own bronze tokens in 1791 and 1792, it turned to […]

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  • 11
    Apr

A Tale of Two Noses: Nixon Inaugural Medals

By Gerald Tebben Richard M. Nixon, the only president to resign from office, in disgrace, was many things to many people in the 1960s and 1970s. To caricaturists, he was a godsend; to serious artists, a plague. Say what you will about the man’s policies and politics, but the beady eyes, the hunched shoulders, the […]

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  • 3
    Apr

Revolutionary Honors: Medals Mark Struggle for American Independence

By Gerald Tebben The largely unremembered war began with the George Washington’s surrender and ended essentially with the accession of George III to the British throne. The French and Indian War, the mid-18th century struggle that was all but overshadowed by the American Revolution, was a topsy-turvy fight that left a significant mark on American […]

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  • 6
    Feb

In Memoriam of McKinley—Medal Honors Third Slain U.S. President

By Gerald Tebben A shocked nation was reeling in 1901. For the third time in 35 years, an assassin had taken the life of an American president. This time a nut job with a handgun had turned a New York celebration into a national tragedy. Inventor Thomas Edison’s cameras recorded William McKinley’s visit to the […]

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