• 17
    May

A Very Good Year for the Nation and Its Coins

By Gerald Tebben The year 1776 was a good one for the nation and numismatics. Every coin from the famous year carries with it the tremendous power of the date and a good tale. Only a handful of 1776 U.S. coins are known: the mysterious New Hampshire coin, a trio of unique pattern Massachusetts coppers, […]

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  • 15
    May

Collecting the Royals: Kings, Queens and Pretenders to the Throne

There seems to be a lot of abdicating going around. First, Pope Benedict XVI stepped down as Supreme Pontiff (a kind of monarchy), the first reigning Pope to do so in 600 years. Then Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, who was on the throne for only 33 years, abdicated in favor of her eldest son, […]

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  • 4
    May

Early 20th-C. South African 20 Pound Specimen Leads Banknotes & Scripophily Sale

FORT LEE, N.J. – An early 20th century Standard Bank of South Africa color trial specimen banknote for 20 Pounds sold for $10,620 at an auction (Part XIV) held Apr. 16 by Archives International Auctions. The note, printed in blue with gold underprint, was in almost uncirculated condition. It was also the top lot in […]

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  • 3
    May

Q & A with Harry Rinker: Whitney Reed Rocking Horse, Hindenburg Ephemera

QUESTION: Several years ago I purchased a Whitney Reed, glider base, rocking horse for $600. The horse is 33-inches long and 31-inches to the top of its ear. It is missing its mane but has its tail. In researching Whitney Reed rocking horses on the Internet, most of the examples I found are larger than […]

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  • 29
    Apr

The Columbus Mint That Never Was

By Gerald Tebben You won’t find any 1877-C gold $10 eagles in any collection, but it wasn’t for lack of trying. This is a tale about a U.S. Mint facility that never was. Fifteen years after the C mintmark of the Charlotte Branch Mint fell victim to the Civil War, Northern citizens sought to bring […]

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  • 28
    Apr

Elusive Coins: They’re Out There Somewhere

By Gerald Tebben In collecting, the rare but attainable coins, such as the 1916 Standing Liberty quarter dollar (mintage 52,000); ultrarare coins, such as the 1894-S Seated Liberty dime (mintage 24) and unique pieces or those no longer known to exist are the stuff of numismatic legend. Louis E. Eliasberg Sr., the only person to […]

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  • 23
    Apr

Pontefract Coins: Born in the Blood of Battle

By Gerald Tebben The reign of England’s Charles I ended as with the strong swing of a sharp axe on Jan. 30, 1649. The execution marked the beginning of the interregnum when Parliament ruled “without any king.” Parliament, victorious in a series of conflicts known as the English Civil War, had ordered the king executed […]

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  • 19
    Apr

If John Beat George: What Early American Coins May Have Looked Like

By Gerald Tebben In an alternate universe, our first president, John Adams, placed his own portrait on coins in 1792. President William Jennings Bryan ushered in an era of giant silver coins in 1896, and President Alton Brooks Parker allowed old designs to continue to circulate in 1904. But that’s just in our alternate reality. […]

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  • 14
    Apr

Furor Over a Florin: Great Britain’s ‘Godless’ Coin

By Gerald Tebben As cholera swept England in 1849, attention fell on the country’s new coin. A godless coin. A coin that failed to give God his due. Deaths mounted as the coin spread in circulation, giving pause to the cautious and a reason for the pestilence to those who sought mortal causes for God’s […]

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  • 13
    Apr

Use A Coin, Go to Jail: The Monneron Medal of Confidence

By Gerald Tebben Trade tokens tend to be simple affairs that make do for money in times of economic stress. During the French Revolution, though, nothing less than fine engraving, exactingly struck on large planchets would do. When Monneron Brothers’ Paris banking house created its own bronze tokens in 1791 and 1792, it turned to […]

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