• 22
    Jan

Damien Hirst’s Natural History Series: Will it Pass the Test of Time?

After a recent WorthPoint article about collecting deteriorating pieces of royal wedding cakes, including a 172-year-old morsel from Queen Victoria’s ceremony, I wondered about other unusual collections. Damien Hirst immediately came to mind, especially since his new studio factory has been in the news this past year. Britain’s Hirst (born in 1965) is one of […]

Read More
  • 4
    Jan

Antiques Auction Forum Podcast: Colleene Fesko on the Cape Ann School

In this week’s installment of the Antiques Auction Forum podcast, Martin Willis speaks with Colleene Fesko, who is frequently seen on the hit PBS television series Antiques Roadshow. Martin and Colleene talk about the John Gale Art Collection of Cape Ann School paintings. She also discusses the Internet’s changing effects on the art market, fakes […]

Read More
  • 14
    Nov

Unloved Antiques: ‘Starving Artist’ Paintings

The 14th item in this series of Unloved Antiques is really more decorative arts than antique, but we get a huge number of requests for information regarding this item, more than for just about anything else. It’s what I call the “starving artist” painting. Based on the number I see, I think every home in North […]

Read More
  • 4
    Oct

Ask A Worthologist Question: Art Deco ‘Fayral’ Figurine

Anne P. has an interesting figurine that she bought at a silent auction fundraiser last month. She bid on it because it was the only thing at the sale she was remotely interested in and buying it would support a cause she felt strongly about. She’s since had the time to examine it, found it […]

Read More
  • 12
    Sep

Unloved Antiques: 19th-Century Religious Prints

The tenth item in this series of “Unloved Antiques” is late 19th- to early 20th-century religious prints, such as those depicting Patron Saints, Guardian Angels or the Madonna were very popular from the turn of the 19th century through the 1930s. Virtually any Catholic home—particularly those of European origins of the period—would have an image […]

Read More
  • 25
    Apr

Unloved Antiques: Mass-Produced Decorator Prints

The third item in this series of “Unloved Antiques” (read the first two installments here and here) is the Decorator Print, like this one titled “Cupid Awake” by photographer Morris Burke Parkinson. This print was produced from 1897 through to the 1920s, if not later, and distributed by the Taber Prang Art Company of Springfield, Mass., […]

Read More
  • 23
    Mar

The Collector’s Minute: Equestrian Prints

One item we see more of than just about anything else in the appraisal & antique business are late 19th- to early 20th-century “equestrian prints,” generally depicting fox hunting, or as Oscar Wilde put it, “The unspeakable in pursuit of the Inedible.” Equestrian prints of were quite popular during this period, most were based on […]

Read More
  • 21
    Mar

Ask A Worthologist Question: Bronzi Oni Statue

Sam L. bought this bronze figure at an antique store about five years ago. He found it so ugly he almost felt sorry for it and brought it home. The dealer who sold it specialized mainly in furniture and didn’t know much about it. After many inquiries about it, he recently he decided it was […]

Read More
  • 7
    Feb

Identifying Historical Fire Brigade Buckets Painted by ‘The Borden Limner’

I came from a town right outside of a small New Hampshire historical harbor city, Portsmouth. It was first settled in 1630 and has wonderful early brick architecture and early wooden homes and structures. It is a treasure trove of regional antiques of all sorts. There are many renowned pieces originating from Portsmouth, including exceptional […]

Read More
  • 24
    Aug

Navigating the Stormy Seas of Maritime Art Collecting

The greatest expansion of maritime trade, and perhaps the greatest output of steam and sailing ships, occurred between 1850 and 1920. Coincidentally, this period is often referred to as the “Golden Age of Ship Portraiture.” The Civil War (1861-1865) was the first American war that used vessels driven by steam instead of sailing ships. Few […]

Read More