• 19 Feb
    2013

Unloved Antiques: Reproduction Victorian-Era Spyglasses

The next item in this series of Unloved Antiques is something that causes big problems in the antique and collectibles market: reproduction scientific instruments; the biggest culprits being optical devices like telescopes, binoculars, desktop magnifiers and periscopes. Before the 1970s, the chances of running into reproductions of this type were slim because the high cost […]

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  • 11 Feb
    2013

Collecting JFK: A Second Look at what is Valuable and what is Just Memorabilia?

The upcoming auction of John F. Kennedy memorabilia at the John McInnis Auction Gallery on Feb. 17, 2013, led me to look more closely at an earlier blog I wrote for WorthPoint called “Collecting JFK.” That blog showed the different levels of collectibles and their values, depending on their associations with JFK himself. Ever since […]

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  • 25 Jan
    2013

Antiques Auction Forum Podcast: Dan Meader on the JFK Items Up for Auction

In this week’s installment of the Antiques Auction Forum podcast, Martin Willis visits John McInnis’ Auction Gallery in Amesbury, Mass. and talks with Dan Meader about the important John F. Kennedy memorabilia that belonged to David F. Powers, JFK’s White House special assistant and longtime confidant. Check out the upcoming Presidential Auction items here. Listen […]

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  • 18 Jan
    2013

Tips on Collecting 2013 Presidential Inauguration Memorabilia

Curiously, since 1901, the preparation for the swearing in of the new president of the United States actually falls to Congress or, more precisely, the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies. The committee was established only to ensure that the president-elect fulfills the one requirement under the Constitution, to witness the prescribed oath to “enter […]

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  • 2 Aug
    2010

Cincinnati Offers a Hotbed of Early Firefighter Collectibles

Fathers, ask your sons today what they want to be when they grow up. The answer isn’t the same as it was when you were a kid, when the answer was reliable: a fireman. Today, however, he may say “rescue hero,” considering our ever-growing regard for the brave New York City firefighters since 9/11. More […]

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  • 19 Jul
    2010

The Collector’s Minute: Chemical Cart Fire Extinguisher

“Chemical Cart” extinguishers were used in factories and towns all over the United States from the late 19th century onward. This one depicted in the advertisement was made by the Badger Fire Extinguisher Company in Boston, Mass. Most late-19th- to early-20th-century pieces like this were obsolete by the 1930s and few survived the scrap drives […]

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  • 21 Jun
    2010

Ask A Worthologist Question: Koch Barber Chair

Jeff S. is trying to sell a barber’s chair he had purchased a few years ago. The prices dealers are offering are leaving him flat. So engaged WorthPoint’s “Ask a Worthologist” service, and it was forwarded to me. Here is Jeff’s question: “I paid $1,600 for this Koch Barber chair at an auction in 2006. […]

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  • 5 Apr
    2010

Civil War Show Find: Finely Carved Spring-Loaded Lancet

My father and I participated in the Civil War Show at the North Georgia Trade Center in Dalton, Ga., during the first weekend of February this year. Participants exhibited items ranging from firearms, swords, dug relics, glassware, flags and medical items to household items used during the period. Wandering the show, looking for something to […]

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  • 30 Jun
    2009

‘Neat’ Set of Apothecaries Measures

People become antique dealers for various reasons. Some do so when their personal collection becomes too big for their home and, at retirement, opening a shop seems a good idea. Others start collecting and trading at a young age and at some point realizes they are a “dealer.” However we come to it, we all […]

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  • 29 Jan
    2009

Umbrellas Double as Presidential Campaign Devices

By Tom Carrier WorthPoint Worthologist It is amazing sometimes in the world of collectibles that a relatively mundane item becomes an important historical artifact simply because it lasted 100 years. Prior to 1896, hats, ribbons, clothing buttons, parade torches, lanterns and other innocuous everyday items were produced not only as functional items, but also doubled […]

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