• 22
    Jan

Presidential Campaign Tin Trays

By Tom Carrier WorthPoint Worthologist Throughout the 19th century, supporters for American presidential candidates were able to advertise their loyalty by buying some rather unusual items, or at least considered unusual in the era of bumper stickers and pinback buttons. Prior to the 1896 election, the torch light parade through town in honor of your […]

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  • 22
    Jan

What Makes a Political Button Valuable?

By Tom Carrier WorthPoint Worthologist Common or scarce? Political buttons were created for campaigns, for issues, even for special events—or sometimes just because. With so many different kinds of political campaign buttons available since they were first created in 1896, and more than 3,000 for the Obama campaign alone, how can you know which ones […]

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  • 22
    Jan

William Jennings Bryan Items from the 1908 Democratic Convention

By Tom Carrier WorthPoint Worthologist WorthPoint was a sponsor of the American Presidential Experience in Denver, Colo., earlier this year. This travelling road show of the American presidency was set up just outside Invesco Stadium in Denver as part of the 2008 Democratic National Convention. Inside were exhibits such as a full-scale replica of the […]

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  • 14
    Jan

The Perils of Improperly Storing Your Campaign Buttons

Have you just started to collect political buttons? Did your grandfather just give you his prized collection of buttons from the presidential campaign of John F. Kennedy? Did you mother just hand over the women’s suffrage movement buttons worn by your great, great grandmother, who marched for the right for women to vote? Or did […]

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  • 29
    Dec

Tools of the Trade: Amputation Saws

You know, if you read my blog on amputation sets, that amputations were the surgical procedures most performed during the Civil War. Resection was a procedure performed then as well, but it took a long time and it was a fact that soldiers had a better chance of survival the quicker the operation. The earliest […]

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  • 15
    Dec

Preserving a George Washington Centennial Ribbon

Even at 132 years old, George Washington could be better preserved, at least as he appears on this wonderfully preserved Jacquard silk ribbon from the 1876 Centennial Exposition. It was one of many antiques and collectibles evaluated by WorthPoint Worthologists at the “Treasures from the Attic” antiques and collectible show in Manassas, VA in March […]

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  • 15
    Nov

The George Washington Trivet

According to Kelly & Ellwood in their 1990 book Trivets & Stands, the first George Washington Trivet was designed and cast in brass for the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition of 1876. George Washington was an appropriate subject, considering that the Exposition was held to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Dec

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  • 11
    Nov

Crazy Prices for Obama Victory Papers

November 5 was a very special day for the United States of America. When Barack Obama was declared the next president of the United States, hot collectibles were the next morning’s newspaper. Across the country, the demand for the Nov. 5 edition of the newspaper, any newspaper, was astronomical.

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  • 7
    Nov

Political Collectibles: What’s Hot

Someone once suggested to me that when an election is over, the buttons and posters and everything are all trash. I immediately countered that this may be the one area of collectibles where items from an event continue to have a value well after it has ended.

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  • 28
    Oct

The Family Sandifer and the Dumpster Collectibles Campaign

There are stories of finding antiques and collectibles in the most unlikely places. Flea markets, antique shops, your grandma’s attic. But, the dumpster?

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