• 15 May
    2009

How to Tell if a Eames Lounge Chair Has Been Repaired

Many sellers and buyers who are familiar with the design and history of the Eames lounge will tell you it is usually not a matter of if, but when the construction will fail. Because there are no screws protruding through the wood shells and holding the chair “together,” the design carries the inherent risk of […]

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  • 12 May
    2009

Telling the Age of Your Vintage (or Newer) Eames Lounge

OK, now that you have discovered if that Eames lounge is real or fake (The Iconic Eames Lounge Chair; Is That One Real or Fake?), how do you determine its age? Because these chairs were mass-produced, certain parts, pieces and custom orders floated from year to year, so using exact years to date an Eames […]

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  • 15 Apr
    2009

The Shakers’ Purity Extended to Style

Editor’s Note: The Shakers were, unquestionably, a very strange sect, but that didn’t stop them from producing what are now exquisite antiques. Let Robert Reed give you a primer on the Shakers and their beautifully crafted creations. For the Shakers, there were always two worlds. One contained their communities and the carefully crafted objects that […]

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  • 26 Mar
    2009

Stickley Furniture Crafted by Another Stickley

The best known Stickley furniture, and the most valuable on today’s market, hailed from the workshop of Gustav Stickley (1858-1942), the creator of the “Mission” style in North America. Because the style was such a success, Stickley’s brothers produced similar pieces in their firms: L. & J.G. Stickley, Stickley & Brandt, and Stickley Bros., but […]

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  • 23 Mar
    2009

Antique Art Furniture: The Aesthetic Movement

Furniture is sometimes described as being “functional art.” The functioning part is generally obvious. The table has to stand up straight, the drawers have to open and close and the bed has to keep you up at night. But the art part? Since the definition of what is actually art is so open to interpretation, […]

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  • 11 Mar
    2009

Make Your Antiques Furniture Work for You

Owning an antique, whether it be a piece of jewelry, a vintage automobile or a dining table from the early 19th century, is a rewarding and fulfilling proposition. Pride of ownership is apparent in most people lucky enough to possess such treasures, and that pride is displayed as often as the piece. Owning a piece […]

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  • 20 Feb
    2009

The Keys to Antique Furniture Locks

Most of us who are interested in antique furniture have, at one time or another, run across what seemed liked an intractable problem at the time: the locks on an antique chest or desk. The usual approach is to either ignore the locks or take the attitude that if the key is around, great, if […]

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  • 2 Feb
    2009

The Tale of Old Nails

One of the key ingredients in the process of determining the age of a piece of older or antique furniture is how the wood is assembled to produce this functional work of art. Drawers are typically put together using various methods of wood joinery, i.e. dovetails, scallop joints or rabbets. Older case goods generally employ […]

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  • 30 Jan
    2009

Discussing Sheraton and Victorian Furniture with Will Seippel

By Tom Carrier WorthPoint Worthologist EDITOR’S NOTE: Brimfield, Mass., is a small New England town with a population of about 5,000 or so. Settled in 1706, it shows its traditional New England quaintness rather well. It has its large, steepled church, and with the leaves of autumn or the snow of winter, looks the part […]

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  • 23 Jan
    2009

The Red King—Mahogany in Antique Furniture

By Fred Taylor WorthPoint Worthologist When you think of “period” antique furniture, what first comes to mind? Chippendale? Sheraton? Hepplewhite? Phyfe? Of course. These are all direct word associations with the phrase “period,” and with much justification, since these are some of the all time great names in furniture history. But another word belongs right […]

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