• 24 Aug
    2013

Traditional Furniture Dimensions: Will It Fit in Today’s Life?

Assume for a minute that you have found an interesting piece of older or antique furniture that looks like it might do quite nicely in the new family room, den, bedroom or study. It appears to be a style you believe you’ve correctly identified and can get comfortable with. The finish is in pretty good […]

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  • 15 Aug
    2013

Illuminating Antique Furniture: Let There Be Light… with Caution

Have you ever stopped to think how important light is to your antique furniture? A good place to start is the fact that without the right light, the trees that were used to provide the lumber of your furniture would never have grown. That’s easy and obvious enough. Another less obvious but equally important aspect […]

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  • 12 Aug
    2013

Q & A with Harry Rinker: Chance is a Scarce Commodity in the Antiques World

NOTE: While this “Rinker on Collectibles” Questions and Answers column focuses only on one question, the information and principals discussed in the second half of the answer have universal application. QUESTION: I have seven pieces of Old Hickory furniture that came from a rural Pennsylvania fishing and hunting lodge built in the late 1930s or […]

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  • 30 Jul
    2013

Antiques Auction Forum Podcast: The Corey Daniels Gallery

In this week’s Antiques Auction Forum podcast, Martin Willis stops along busy U.S.-1 in Wells, Maine, and has a conversation with gallery owner Corey Daniels and gallery director/artist, Miles Spadone. Cory discusses his transitions from 18th-century period furniture to today’s contemporary art, which he displays in a beautiful setting. Check out the Corey Daniels Gallery […]

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  • 11 Jul
    2013

What’s Under Your Seat? A Short History of Cushioning

Has that old couch gotten a little shaky? Sinking in spots? Maybe that old chair has gotten lumpy and the recliner is getting to be downright uncomfortable. What’s inside of these things that allows them to get out of sorts? That depends a great deal on when the piece was made, the original quality of […]

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  • 9 Jul
    2013

Chinese Qianlong Celadon Jade Censer to Pace Crescent City Auction

NEW ORLEANS – An 18th-century Chinese Qianlong celadon jade censer with a pre-sale estimate of $15,000-$25,000 and items from the living estate of iconic New Orleans artist and photographer George Valentine Dureau will be part of a huge weekend auction planned for July 13-14. The auction will be conducted by Crescent City Auction Gallery, in […]

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  • 8 Jul
    2013

And Now for the Bad News: When Your Family Heirloom Isn’t a Treasure

Life is full of little disappointments, especially these days. One of the ways that disappointment shows itself is when I have to disclose to inquiring readers that their family treasure just isn’t. Of course I do not go out looking for people on whom to heap disappointment, at least not usually. They seek me out—not […]

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  • 27 Jun
    2013

Treasures That Aren’t: The Most Faked Collectibles

In antiques and collectibles, you’ve got your share of frauds and scams. We’ve been shocked by stories of imposters who can create “authentic” paintings by the world’s masters, produce ancient art objects, forge signatures on baseballs, create “rare” books, “find” long lost stamps and “discover” historical letters or diaries. Even antique wine has been fabricated. […]

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  • 14 Jun
    2013

The Collector’s Minute: Empire versus Empire Revival

About once a month, we have a piece of furniture submitted by excited clients who are positive what they found is well more than 150 years old because they saw a similar one on the Internet, in an antique store or on Antiques Roadshow. Nine times out of ten, the piece in question is in […]

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  • 14 Jun
    2013

The Many Origins of the Ubiquitous Coffee Table

I know you have one. You probably have two or more. And you’re pretty sure at least one of them is an antique. You likely think, “It belonged to Grandma, and she got it used a long time ago so it has to be an antique.” What am I talking about? That ubiquitous low-level surface […]

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