• 27
    Jan

Lost and Found Visuals: The Art and Value of Vernacular Photography

The old photograph was pasted into a scrapbook and had crusty brown rubber cement seeping around the edges. The image was a little girl with a sneaky smile and dark bangs, peeking out of the paneled window of a white frame house. Her tiny finger subtly pointed to the ominous city quarantine sign on the […]

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  • 6
    Jan

Is That Old Circus Poster You Found Authentic or a Reproduction? More Answers

Nearly seven years ago I wrote my first article for WorthPoint—“Is That Old Circus Poster You Found Authentic or a Reproduction?”—a guide to help identify circus poster reproductions. Ever since, I have been receiving e-mails with comments about that article and questions about posters readers have found. Hopefully, I can answer or clarify some of […]

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  • 18
    Dec

Naughty or Nice: ‘It’s a Wonderful Life,’ Capra, Commies and the FBI

“He’s making a list, checking it twice; gonna find out who’s naughty or nice…” When Coots & Gillespie’s famous Christmas song debuted on Eddie Cantor’s radio show in 1934, they warned that “Santa Claus is coming to town.” Not many years later, in Hollywood, Calif., a new set of lyrics could apply: “J. Edgar Hoover […]

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  • 16
    Dec

Collector’s Minute: First Commercial Christmas Card

To collectors, there is always a “Holy Grail” or the “Stuff of Dreams” for their category of collecting, for which, of course, a small fortune would be required to obtain the item. For Collectors of Christmas memorabilia there are many items out there that could fill their personal “12 Days of Christmas” wish list. The […]

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  • 10
    Dec

Postcard Time Machine: Christmas—The Way it Never Was

These days, I hear people bemoaning the commercialization of the holiday season. At least once during Black Friday, there’s a tale on the news of a shopper being trampled by a thundering horde galloping toward a big sale. But in the wonderful world of postcards, there are never any arguments or disagreements, worries about money […]

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  • 8
    Dec

Christmas Movie Posters: A Yuletide Collectible Category

Some of our strongest memories of Christmas involve movies, either those that evoke the very ethos of Christmas or others which have a Christmas like theme. Often, the movies we associate with Christmas can be very personal. Posters for Christmas movies vary in collectability and in the genre in which they are based. With the […]

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  • 26
    Nov

The History of Thanksgiving Day, as told in The Ladies’ World, 1892

As a fans of antiques and collectibles, whose interest in history is peaked by the things we collect, we thought it would be interesting to provide here an account of Thanksgiving in America as it was thought of more than a century ago. What follows is “The History of Thanksgiving Day” as it appeared in pages […]

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  • 16
    Nov

What Makes an Autograph Valuable? Five Ways to Assess your Signed Memorabilia

Autographs have always been a part of our lives. Both of us have spent many, many years in the autograph and memorabilia business, both selling and acquiring autographs. Over that time, we have seen autograph collecting evolve from keepsakes on torn pieces of paper or scorecard to an industry that spits them out rapid fire. […]

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  • 5
    Nov

Official Thanksgiving Proclamation are Attractive and Cherished Collectibles

Holidays allows us to share the spirit through postcards, figurines, glassware, commemorative plates, stamps, coins and greeting cards, among many others. Very few of the holidays, though, get officially recognized as Thanksgiving does. That’s because it is usually done through an official Thanksgiving Proclamation. Called ephemera in the collecting world, any paper or printed item […]

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  • 23
    Oct

History Shines Light on Celebrating Halloween Collectibles

  The tradition of Halloween is rooted deep in the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, dating back almost 2,000 years. In the areas that are now Ireland, the United Kingdom and France, the New Year was celebrated on November 1, a day that divided summer and the coming of a long, dark winter. Winter was […]

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