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Flags Banners and Standards
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Showing results 21 - 30 of 31 for the category: Flags Banners and Standards.

British National Flag of World War II (2/5/08)
British National Flag hand made in Belgium, WWII, closeupThere’s a mystery to this flag. Here is what we do know. It is definitely the flag of Great Britain and that it is definitely of World War II vintage. It is truly a big flag measuring 50 x 70 inches or about 4′ to almost 6′. We know that it was made in Belgium and appears to be completely hand made using a standard home-based sewing machine, not a commercial one. More >>


Good Flag, Bad Flag: Five Ways to Design a Good Flag (2/2/08)
Bad Flag - State of New HampshireThere really is no such thing as a bad flag. Any time a community reaches out to symbolize their past, their achievements, and their people is a good thing. Still, there are ways for your community to be remembered more easily when it comes to your flag design. So, here are five basic things to remember: 1. Keep it Simple: A flag should be so simple a child can draw it from memory… More >>


Flag of Iraq to Change (1/24/08)
Proposed new flag of IraqThe Associated Press today announced that Iraq’s parliament voted to change the national flag of Iraq. The current national flag (on the top far left) consists of three horizontal stripes of red, white, and black with three green stars in the white stripe with the Takbir, the words ‘Allahu Akbar’ or ‘God is Great’, in green stylized Arabic calligraphy in between the stars. More >>


13 Star Flags: How to Identify an Authentic 18c One (1/18/08)
The familiar 13 star pattern of an 18th century U.S. national flagThe Flag Act of June 14, 1777 states “…that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white: that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field…” Nowhere does it say how the stars were to be arranged. That is why there are so many different ‘national’ standards of this period simply because the star pattern wasn’t regulated until about 1912 or so. More >>


Flags of Oz (1/18/08)
The royal flag of OzMany generations have read the children’s book series “The Wizard of Oz” ever since L. Frank Baum published his first book in 1900. He wrote a total of 14 books for the series until his death in 1919 (his last book was published pothumously in 1920). More >>


Flags of Political Parties (12/27/07)
Flag of the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) of Benazir Bhutto, image by Joe McMillan of Flags of the WorldWith the recent assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan, any national funeral will feature the flag of the national party she headed. This great leader of independence for her country also featured flags of other political parties throughout Pakistan, both large and small. More >>


Flag Etiquette Around the World (12/27/07)
Flag of the United NationsThe Flag Code of the United States is rather precise when it comes to dealing respectfully with the flag of the United States. More >>


The Unofficial Flags of the US (12/6/07)
The Since the United States first adopted the stars and stripes as the official flag design on June 14th 1777, it has been changed 27 times. At first an additional stripe as well as a star were added to the new flag when new states were recognized. That resulted in the only 15 star and 15 stripe US flag on May 1st, 1795. More >>


Which is a better collectible: A 48 or 49 star flag? (12/5/07)
49 star US flag official patternIt isn’t surprising that when asked to choose between a 48 star US flag or a 49 star US flag, invariably the 48 star flag is always chosen first. The reasoning is that the 48 star flag is older than the 49 star one and hence more collectible. The short answer is yes and no. More >>


What flag is that? (11/11/07)
A very large, outdated national flag of Sierra LeoneThe Chesapeake Bay Flag Association held a meeting at the Flag House in Baltimore, Maryland on November 10, 2007 as they do periodically.  The Flag House is the site where Mary Pickersgill had sewn what is now known as the Star Spangled Banner flag, the one that flew over Fort McHenry during the bombardment of Baltimore by the British in 1814.  This flag, now in the Smithsonian Institution, i More >>


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