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Home > News, Articles & Multimedia > Worth Points > Auction Report: Pook and Pook Fine Art, Furniture and Accessories Sale

Auction Report: Pook and Pook Fine Art, Furniture and Accessories Sale

by Christopher Kent (04/13/09).

Pook and Pook is about to do it again—pull off a sale comprised of good, honest art and antiques. True to form and in a long tradition, Pook and Pook has assembled a collection of furniture, fine and decorative art, and objects d’art that includes an amazing selection of Russian enamels to regional quilts. This diverse sale goes up on the block the April 24 and 25. Let’s first take a look at two fine pieces of Russian enamel.

Lot 114 and 115 are possibly the most pivotal pieces in the collection of Russian enamels. Lot 114 is a Russian silver-and-enamel tankard made circa 1900 with a clear maker’s mark of OV Chinnikov. The tankard stands just 7-and-a-half inches high and has an estimate of $5,000 to $10,000. Lot 115 is an extremely well designed lidded chalice or perhaps ciborium (a vessel to hold the wafer). Circa 1900, it bears the maker’s mark, Feodor Ruckert, a well-known and documented silver and goldsmith. The lid bears the Russian imperial double-headed eagle finial, and the body is in the teardrop-form panel. The chalice measures 13 inches high and has an estimate of $8,000 to $12,000.

Russian tankard, circa 1900

Russian tankard, circa 1900

Ruckert lidded chalice

Ruckert lidded chalice

Lot 142 is a classic example of Philadelphia Georgian silver. Made circa 1790 by the well-known silversmith, Joseph Richardson Jr., the helmet-form creamer is decorated with a beaded edge and elaborate monogram above an incised floral garland. The creamer measures 7-and-a-quarter inches high and has a low estimate of $1,000 to $1,500.

Richardson creamer

Richardson creamer

Lot 150, a fine, museum-quality, New York silver tea or chocolate pot made by the well-known silversmith, Jacob Marius Groen, circa 1730. The pot is of the “lighthouse” form with an “onslow” thumb tab. Classically simple, this is a rare opportunity to own a piece by Groen. It is well worth its $12,000 to $18,000 estimate.

Groen tea or chocolate pot

Groen tea or chocolate pot

Lot 292, the Hollingsworth Family Baltimore Album Quilt. This important quilt, 1884-1846, consists of 53 appliqué and patchwork blocks and contains 14 signatures of prominent northern Maryland families. The quilt measures 79 inches by 88 inches and has an estimate of $7,000 to $9,000.

Hollingsworth family quilt

Hollingsworth family quilt

p-and-p-lot-292-quilt-closeup-2

Lot 366, a significant Delaware Valley Queen Anne walnut chest on frame, circa 1770. A fresh piece to the market, the chest on stand has a molded cornice that appears over five short and three long drawers resting on a frame that has a scalloped apron and cabriole legs terminating in trifid feet. This piece has a provincial integrity and is appropriately estimated at $6,000 to $9,000.

Queen Anne walnut chest

Queen Anne walnut chest

Lot 407 is the cream of the sale and an extremely rare opportunity to own a perhaps one-of-a-kind piece. It is a Simon Willard regulator banjo clock, circa 1805.The mahogany case encloses an eight-day, weight-driven works with a sweep hand and painted dial inscribed Simon Willard. The clock stands 52 inches. This clock is pictured in Sacks’ book “Good, Better, Best,” page 135. A similar Willard regulator clock without a sweep second hand is discussed in Diston and Bishops’ “The American Clock,” plate 283. The Willard clock has the deserved estimate of $18,000 to $25,000.

Willard regulator banjo clock

Willard regulator banjo clock

– By Christopher Kent, a member of the WorthPoint board of advisers and director of evaluations for WorthPoint. He is also an antiques and collectibles generalist, fine-arts broker and president of CTK Design.

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