Jacques Littlefield’s Collection of Tanks and other Historic Military Vehicles Auctioned

More than 100 tanks and other military vehicles from the collection of Silicon Valley engineer Jacques Littlefield, including this World War Two Sherman tanks, were sold at an auction facilitated by American Auctions and held on Friday and Saturday,  July 11-12.

More than 100 tanks and other military vehicles from the collection of Silicon Valley engineer Jacques Littlefield, including this World War Two Sherman tanks, were sold at an auction facilitated by American Auctions and held on Friday and Saturday, July 11-12.

PORTOLA VALLEY, Calif. — Collectors from around the world said “tanks a lot” when they bought up more than 100 tanks and other military vehicles from the collection of Silicon Valley engineer Jacques Littlefield in an auction facilitated by American Auctions and held on Friday and Saturday, July 11-12.

Littlefield, a Stanford University-trained engineer who had worked at Hewlett-Packard before he began collecting military vehicles, had amassed one of the most extensive and historic collection in the world. Bidding came in from 10 countries and across the United States, nearly cleaning out the auction’s 122 vehicles lots. The sale overall realized $10.24 million.

The auction featured military vehicles used in conflicts ranging from the First World War to the Gulf War. The top lot was an 8-ton personnel carrier that fetched $1.2 million. A WW II Sherman tank and an 8K11 SCUD-A surface-to-surface missile launcher (with missile), each hammered for $345,000.

Like many boys, Littlefield’s fascination with military vehicles started as a child, when he began building plastic scale models of them, and later fashioned a remote-control scale model tank in college. He bought his first full size military vehicle in 1975—a World War Two-era M3 Scout Car. In 1998, he founded the Military Vehicle Technology Foundation to manage this collection and to acquire and restore new examples.

This 8K11 SCUD-A surface-to-surface missile launcher (with missile) sold for $345,000.

After Littlefield died in 2009, his family donated the collection to the Collings Foundation, which is dedicated to preserving the machines that helped build the world and helped keep it free by displaying these machines to honor those who were influenced by them. Proceeds from this auction will go to build a military vehicle wing at the foundation’s headquarters in Stow, Mass.

Not every vehicle from the Littlefield collection was put on the block, as the foundation reserved the most historical and valuable tanks and vehicles, including a World War I tank.


WorthPoint—Discover Your Hidden Wealth