Start free trial

Home > News, Articles & Multimedia > Worth Points > Selections from the Baio Collection of Photographs Go on the Block

Selections from the Baio Collection of Photographs Go on the Block

by WorthPoint Staff (04/12/10).

William Klein’s “Stickball Player, New York,” 1954—a dynamic portrayal of a stickball game in the artist’s neighborhood—is estimated to bring between $10,000 and $15,000) at the April 15, 2010 sale of selections from the Baio Collection of Photographs.

William Klein’s “Stickball Player, New York,” 1954—a dynamic portrayal of a stickball game in the artist’s neighborhood—is estimated to bring between $10,000 and $15,000) at the April 15, 2010 sale of selections from the Baio Collection of Photographs.

NEW YORK – Selections from the Baio Collection of Photographs—which embraces many of the photographic techniques and methods used over the last 170 years, with a central theme running through its diverse imagery: children—will be put up for auction on April 15, 2010, at Rockefeller Center.

The sale will be facilitated by Christie’s New York.

“The Baio Collection of Photographs has been built with incredible focus and depth, making it one of the most impressive and thoughtfully curated collections of photography in private hands,” explains Matthieu Humery, Christie’s head of sale in New York. “The sheer number of canonic photographers, combined with the wide range of estimates, makes this selection attractive to both longtime collectors as well as those new to the field.”

One can follow the trajectory of the theme through the framework of the urban environment, starting with an early 1930s view of the shadowed walkways of Spain in Seville by Henri Cartier-Bresson, through Simpson Kalisher’s mid-century composition of vivacious young boys crowding the camera, to a quintessentially American suburban landscape by Garry Winogrand and Philip-Lorca DiCorcia’s contemporary portrayal of the crowded, fast-moving streets of Tokyo. Through these photographs, as well as other by Eugène Atget, Lee Friedlander, Helen Levitt, Harry Callahan, Gregory Crewdson, Ralph Eugene Meatyard and Sally Mann, a fascinating tale of youth unfolds.

Leading the collection is a masterwork by Eugène Atget—one of Atget’s best-known works, “Joueur d’Orgue” (Organ Grinder)—could bring $100,000 to $150,000.

Leading the collection is a masterwork by Eugène Atget—one of Atget’s best-known works, “Joueur d’Orgue” (Organ Grinder)—could bring $100,000 to $150,000.

Leading the collection is a masterwork by Atget (1857-1927). One of Atget’s best-known works, “Joueur d’Orgue” (Organ Grinder) (estimate: $100,000-$150,000), belongs to his petits métiers series. This present lot belonged to the Dadaist poet and writer, Tristan Tzara, and is one of only a handful of prints from his negative to have survived that was printed by Atget himself.

Among the notable highlights is a work by Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004), “Mexican Family” (estimate: $20,000-$30,000). This photograph was taken in the early 1930s, when Cartier-Bresson deepened his relationship with the surrealists of the era. DiCorcia (b. 1951) also has three works in the April 15th sale. Of these, “Tokyo” (estimate: $10,000-$15,000) and “Brian in the Kitchen” (estimate: $12,000-$18,000) are prime examples of the artist’s work and demonstrate diCorcia’s staged compositions in carefully planned, real life situations.

The featured work “The Water’s Edge (Hungarian Sea)” (estimate: $15,000-$25,000) by Lázsló Moholy-Nagy (1895-1946) belongs to the period directly after Moholy-Nagy left the Bauhaus School (Germany), but was still heavily entrenched in constructivism, especially focusing on the integration of technology and industry into the arts. The present photograph was originally in the collection of the MoMA, New York.

Elliot Erwitt, an advertising and documentary photographer, often tried to capture ironic and absurd situations, but within everyday backdrops. His “Maquette for a limited edition book” 1950s, will be among the photographs in the sale.

Elliot Erwitt, an advertising and documentary photographer, often tried to capture ironic and absurd situations, but within everyday backdrops. His “Maquette for a limited edition book” 1950s, will be among the photographs in the sale.

Loretta Lux’s (b. 1969) works “Paulin, 2002” and “The Rose Garden, 2001” (estimate for each: $10,000-$15,000) are highly saturated color portraits of young girls. The work of Elliot Erwitt (b. 1928) is also featured in the sale with “Maquette for a limited edition book,” 1950s (estimate: $15,000-25,000). As an advertising and documentary photographer, Erwitt often tried to capture ironic and absurd situations, but within everyday backdrops. “Maquette” includes examples of the candid black and white shots for which Erwitt is so widely known. The maquette is only one of six realized.

Additional highlights include works by Massimo Vitali and William Klein. An artist involved in the use of large-format works, Vitali (b. 1944) captures high-resolution details over broad expanses of everyday scenes. The work “Viareggio” (estimate: $20,000-$30,000) depicts a wide scene of a crowded beach. Klein’s (b. 1926) “Stickball Player, New York,” 1954 (estimate: $10,000-$15,000), is a dynamic portrayal of a stickball game in the artist’s neighborhood. Originally from the Seagram Collection, this image is extraordinarily rare.

For more information about this auction, visit the Christie’s Web site.

———————————

WorthPoint—Discover Your Hidden Wealth

Join WorthPoint on Twitter and Facebook.

Want a picture icon with your comment? Sign up with Gravatar to get one.

Leave a Reply