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Home > News, Articles & Multimedia > Worth Points > Superhero collectibles, designer’s art collection, high-scoring Yankees memorabilia

Superhero collectibles, designer’s art collection, high-scoring Yankees memorabilia

by Sandra Lee Stuart (07/23/08).

Spidey and Superman collectibles to go under the hammer, Yankees memorabilia sell for memorable prices, a lovestruck guy gets busted for buying antiques dolls

Lights, camera, bid!

Hollywood is cleaning out its closets again. The auction house, Profiles in History, will offer more than 1,000 collectibles spanning film history from the Silent Era to some of the most popular recent films based on comic books and superheroes.

The sale is scheduled for July 31-August 1 in Calabasas Hills, Calif.

Available collectibles costumes include Christopher Reeve’s Superman suit, Tobey Maguire’s Spider-Man mask, Ben Affleck’s Daredevil outfit and Dr. Evil and Mini-Me’s spacesuits from “Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me.”

Famous props going under the hammer include the Holy Grail that appears in “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” the axe used by Jack Nicholson’s character in “The Shining” and the tablets given to Charlton Heston’s Moses in 1956′s “The Ten Commandments.”

The catalog of 1,090 lots is available online.

What I did for love . . .

The Associated Press reports a Detroit-area man is under federal investigation for allegedly bilking an insurance company of more than $4 million. The suspect went on a spending spree, but the loot didn’t go toward the usual fast cars, boats and blackjack tables in Vegas.

Instead, authorities say, he bought 399 antiques dolls and accessories as gifts for a woman.

The collection was acquired through Theriault’s, a Maryland-based auction house that specializes in rare dolls. The woman has returned the collection to the auction house, and the dolls can be sold again. Theriault’s is not under investigation, federal authorities said.

Souvenirs of baseball’s royalty fetching a king’s ransom

The combination of hosting the 2008 All-Star Game and demolishing Yankee Stadium at the end of this season gives Yankees-related collectibles a special cache. Game-worn uniform items from the team’s biggest stars are selling for record amounts, and the expected prices for stadium souvenirs are rising.

Bloomberg News reports that the team will sell pieces of the 85-year-old stadium before the wrecking ball swings this fall. An auction of seats alone could raise $20 million, collectors say. The lockers of current stars, such as shortstop Derek Jeter, could fetch $100,000 apiece. Nobody is speculating on how high the bidding might rise for home plate or the pitching rubber.

The Yankees have an agreement with New York-based Steiner Sports Marketing & Memorabilia to sell game-used merchandise. Check its Web site to track what will become available,

The bidding frenzy already has begun. An auction timed for the All-Star Game in New York by sports auctioneers Hunt Auctions of Exton, Pa., included these Yankees highlights:

· The 1939 warm-up jacket worn by Lou Gehrig on the day the Yankees’ legendary first baseman ended his 2,130 consecutive-games streak sold at auction for a record $373,750.

· Babe Ruth’s sweat-stained baseball cap was sold for a record $328,000. An autographed baseball that Ruth hit for his 712th home run went for $172,500.

· Catcher Thurman Munson’s 1970 Rookie of the Year baseball card sold for $46,000.

A little oops was discovered in another sports collectibles auction, this one on eBay. According to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, someone paid $66,000 for 1975 and 1976 Steelers Super Bowl rings despite an error on one of them.

The 1975 Super Bowl IX ring records the score of the first-round playoff game as Steelers 32, Buffalo Bills 6. Wrong. The correct score was Steelers 32, Bills 12—and no one noticed for 30 years.

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