1935 AMERICAS EXPOSITION CALIFORNIA PACIFIC INTERNATION

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  • Item Category: Fraternal, Political, Organizations
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Mar 24,2009
  • Channel: Online Auction
1935 AMERICAS EXPOSITION CALIFORNIA PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL

Folding brochure. America's Exposition 1935 California Pacific International Exposition, 1935. The overall condition is fine. This item is from San Diego, California and it measures 8 x 11 inches, unfolds to 22 x 34 inches. Spectacular full color brochure.

Geared toward exhibitors, the brochure lists the benefits of participating in the 1935 exposition. Inside the brochure is an aerial view of the fair grounds painted by J.B. Larrinaga.

FOR A COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE EXPOSITION:

/calpac/35expo99.htm

Of the five expositions held in the United States in the 1930's, the one in San Diego was the most distinct in appearance. Unlike expositions in Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, and New York City, the San Diego Exposition used the Spanish-Colonial Revival Style buildings remaining from the 1915-16 Panama-California (International) Exposition. Buildings added by architect Richard Requa introduced the linear and streamlined adaptations of other fairs. While the antiseptic newness and extraordinary lighting of 1930's buildings provided a vision of change, in San Diego the fairytale Spanish-Colonial city, created for the 1915-16 fair, struck the spellbinding note.

Bertram Goodhue, master architect of the 1915-16 San Diego Exposition had urged that the temporary buildings on Balboa Park's main avenue, El Prado, be torn down. Caught by the allurement of the theatrical palaces, San Diego's citizens scorned this advice. With the assistance of money from the federal government, they patched up the plaster palaces in 1922 and 1933. The yield of this persistence was the presence of spacious exhibit buildings in Balboa Park that were available for a substantial use.

In August 1933, Frank Drugan, a former representative for the Scripps- Howard newspaper chain, came to San Diego looking for a new start. He visited the renovated El Prado, recognized the potential of the buildings, and persuaded local businessmen to use them as the nucleus for a second exposition. As promoter, Drugan acted the role Colonel "Charlie" Collier had performed for the first exposition. Unlike Collier, Drugan knew how to let other people take the credit for what he had done.

Chicago's 1933-34 Century of Progress Exposition was in its final year. Many of its exhibits could be transported easily to San Diego. In the midst of the Great Depression, the Exposition's displays of consumer goods and mechanical inventions nourished the hope of a Golden Tomorrow in a people who were down but not out. Also, the Chicago Exposition's ability to finance itself through the sale of admission tickets and exhibit space showed San Diego the task of holding an exposition was not the hurdle doubters had made it out to be.

Please see our current auctions featuring a variety of rare Poster, Art and Advertising items including California ephemera from fairs, expositions and festivals; hotel, resort and inns; travel, railroad and souvenirs, etc.

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