1940'S WINNEBAGO AMERICAN INDIAN BEADED WALKING STICK

  • Sold for: Start FREE Trial! or Sign In to see what it's worth.
  • Item Category: Ethnic, Folk & Native American Art
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Feb 11,2008
  • Channel: Online Auction

Cripple Creek Auctions, Inc.

1940'S WINNEBAGO AMERICAN INDIAN BEADED WALKING STICK

NATIVE BEADWORK on WALKING CANE WITH PEYOTE STITCH,

I am a Trading Assistant - I can sell items for you!

This is a sensational

1930's - 1940'S Era

HAND BEADED

NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN

BEADED CANE

or

WALKING STICK

with

PEYOTE STITCH BEADWORK

made by the

WINNEBAGO INDIANS

of

WISCONSIN

This particular beaded Walking Cane or Walking Stick is very unique

First off, we beieve this walking stick was made from an old umbrella stick, that is just our thinking. The walking stick or cane is a decorative walking stick or cane and is not made to be used or take much abuse. So, please understand it is a decorative piece.

This Walking Cane or Walking Stick came from a Denver Couple who had a wonderful Native American Indian Collection that we have been liquidating over the past six months. We will explain more about this couple later. But, this Walking Stick or Cane has been in their collection since the 1960's.

The handle is

Gold Metal

and on the top of the handle it is monomgrammed with a letter

"S"

The handle is ornate with wonderful designs. The gold handle part measures

3" in length

***************

Then t is a section that contains

Mother of Pearl

and this section of Mother of Pearl measures

3" in length

****************

Then, t is another gold section that is ornate with wonderful designs. On this section is a

Butterfly

Made of Jet

This gold section with the jet butterfly measures

2 1/2" in length

***************

Then, down the rod it has been hand beaded with wonderful

Czechoslovakian

Glass Beads

16 Cut Beads

This beadwork was done in

PEYOTE STITCH

Before contact with European civilization, Native Americans Indians were making beautiful objects decorated with natural materials obtained from their own area or through trade. European trade routes eventually crossed into the Americas - which opened up new trade and it gave the Native American Indians access to a variety of different materials and the Indians traded many native items to the Europeans.

In particular, the Native American Indians were very fond of the glass beads. Prior to this time their beadwork was very painstakingly made from bone and shells.

The arrival of explorers and traders from Europe changed the materials Native Americans used, as well as influencing traditional patterns. The Spanish, English, Dutch and French offered glass beads as presents as well as inducements to religious conversion. Native Americans quickly adopted the new material, incorporating glass beads into traditional patterns. Although the first traders offered the finest beads they could get, including amber, millifiori and faceted chevron beads, soon the Native Americans were asking for beads in specific materials, colors and shapes. Adornment)

Most of these early beads came from the glass factories of Murano, Venice - which had softer colors; a few came from France and the Netherlands, and the very popular glass beads made in Bohemia (Czechoslovakia). The beads from Czechoslovakia were introduced in the 19th Century and they were brighter and had a bluish cast. Both the new colors and the more uniform size of the Czech beads appealed to Native American beaders. This resulted in a decline in the use of Venetian beads.

As glass beads spread across North America, each tribe used them to express their own patterns and traditions. Today, bead artists borrow beading techniques and patterns from each other. Many create new beadwork patterns based on tribal culture and traditions.

The style of beadwork on this walking stick or cane is called

PEYOTE STITCH

Peyote or...

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