1964 SILVER PROOF KENNEDY HALF ACCENTED HAIR US COIN

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  • Item Category: Coins & Currency
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Oct 26,2010
  • Channel: Online Auction
1964 SILVER PROOF KENNEDY HALF ACCENTED HAIR HIGHLY GRADED PR 69 CAMEO GUARANTEED AUTHENTIC US MINT

1964 SILVER PROOF KENNEDY

ACCENTED HAIR HALF DOLLAR

PR 69 CAMEO

HIGH GRADE

EXTREAMLY RARE!!! GUARANTEED AUTHENTIC! PHOTOS ARE THE ACTUAL COIN YOU WILL RECEIVE! PROOF HALF Dollar from the PHILADELPHIA MINT ! GOLD GIFT BOX AND VELVET BAG INCLUDED FREE! The silver half-dollar coin holds an esteemed place in U.S. minting, cherished for beauty, history and rarity, this 1964 Silver Half-Dollar is extremely rare in this condition. Put this away for retirement. 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED! Brilliant Un-circulated in PROOF, Excellent Condition! Wonderfully Captured and Preserved in the Coin Holder. Great detail in this beauty! Guaranteed to be Genuine and Authentic!! This coin is in excellent, un-circulated condition with great detail and high relief. MORE INFORMATION ON THIS COIN: Succeeding the Franklin half dollar, the Kennedy half dollar is a coin of the United States first minted in 1964, the year following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The Kennedy half dollar replaced the Franklin half dollar within three months of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy (nine years before the half-dollar would have otherwise been eligible for change). In fact, Gilroy Roberts, the former chief engraver of the mint, and Frank Gasparro, the current chief engraver at the time, designed the coin a mere five days after Kennedy's death—though the profile of Kennedy was the same one Roberts had used for Kennedy's inaugural medal two years earlier. Ironically, the new Kennedy design caused the slow disappearance of the half-dollar as a regular mainstream circulating coin, through a series of unrelated events. First, collectors and even ordinary citizens hoarded the coins of 1964, due to the "new" design and because of sentiment for the late President Kennedy. In 1965 Lyndon Baines Johnson took the United States of America off the silver standard. Also, silver was no longer included in newly-minted dimes and quarters (which became copper-nickel clad), but remained in the half-dollar (but reduced from 90% to 40%). The older Franklin halves of 90% silver were quickly removed from circulation by collectors and hoarders, and since the public now hoarded silver coins, most of the 90% silver 1964s, as well as the 40% silver 1965-1970 halves, saw little circulation as well. By the time the Kennedy half dollar became regular copper-nickel clad in 1971, many banks and merchants were already used to no longer stocking and using the denomination as they were prior to 1964. The half dollar has always circulated to some extent, but has not at the level of circulation it had before 1964. Given the facts that the cash drawers of most merchants do not contain a place for quantities of half dollars, that most vending machines do not accept them, and that the dollar coin is smaller and is the subject of a push for acceptance, the half is likely to retain its limited circulation status. When the 1964 proof coins were first minted, the "I" in "LIBERTY" had a truncated lower-left serif, and the hair above Kennedy’s ear was heavily incised. After approximately 120,000 coins were produced, the dies were revised and the hair smoothed slightly. Jacqueline Kennedy was thought to have disliked the earlier, "accented hair" version (as it came to be known), although the lower relief design might have also have been introduced to facilitate production. Coins produced from the first die typically sell for about four times those from the later version. However, since a substantial number of the earlier coins seem to have been poorly struck; top quality specimens can fetch even higher prices. After the 1964 coin's introduction (around the height of the cold war), the Denver Mint received a number of complaints that the base of Kennedy’s neck bore the hammer and sickle symbol. However, closer examination will reveal that the mark is actually a script form of the initials "GR": Gilroy Roberts’ monogram. In 1975 and 1976, ...

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