1971 DOORS LA WOMAN WINDOW COVER PSYCH BLUES MORRISON

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  • Item Category: Entertainment
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Feb 12,2011
  • Channel: Online Auction

THE DOORS
WINDOW COVER ORIGINAL (BANNED COVER)
USA - ELEKTRA RECORDS (butterfly) - EKS 75001 - STEREO
HIGHLY COLLECTIBLE WINDOW COVER!
"LA Woman" is the Doors' blues-rock swan song (at least, for Jim), and what an album! This is the Lizard King at his bluesman stage, where he gains a certain newfound mystique with possibly, wisdom? Definitely maybe the album for people who like that hard-hitting blues-rock sound.
Being a Doors album, it is bound to have a song or two everyone knows, coming in the form of three songs actually. First, is the quick and infectious melody of "Love Her Madly", a minor hit and a smaller nugget compared to the double headed eight minute monsters of the title song and the ghostly finale "Riders on the Storm". With the track "LA Woman" being the centerpiece song of the album, it highlights the fact that the album on the whole is just a great, plain old driving album. There is nothing greater in the world than driving at night to this album. Not only does Morrison hold his own, but Robby Krieger's guitar and John Densmore's drums are definite ingredients to the song's greatness. "Riders On The Storm" is a fitting end to the album (and to Morrison) with it's quiet piano and the ambient sounds of the falling rain.
The opener "The Changeling" is catchy and tough, showing that band could still play like the young band of old, but with a touch a grittiness that a less-experienced band could not have pulled off. Morrison in his growling gruff greatness... "Cars Hiss By My Windows" still has that old beatnick club-like blues sound which ends in a wah-wah impersonation by Jim. And then, "L' America" builds up in an eerie way, definitely being the "scary song" that seems to be on every Doors album. "Texas Radio and the Big Beat" is a favorite with a lot of people, and it's very interesting and quite unique amongst the rest of the songs. Morrison's vocals are distorted a bit to give that classic radio sound, and it's quite catchy, that's for sure.
Overall, this is one of the bands' finest efforts, and it's amazing Morrison could still pull off all of the stops for his final performance despite all the world weariness his body took in a short amount of time. Still a testament to his greatness, too. Basically, this is the full blossoming of what "Morrison Hotel" started in transforming the Doors from a strange psychedelic band to a complex powerhouse blues-rock band. One of the best 'rock' albums from the 70's.
CONDITION: COVER: VG+ VINYL: NICE VG+

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