1975 NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN ART PAINTING BOBBY HILL

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  • Item Category: Ethnic, Folk & Native American Art
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Dec 26,2007
  • Channel: Online Auction

Cripple Creek Auctions, Inc.

1975 NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN ART PAINTING BOBBY HILL

KIOWA ORIGINAL ART BY WHITE BUFFALO AKA BOBBY HILL

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This is an

ORIGINAL PAINTING

by a

NATIVE AMERICAN KIOWA INDIAN ARTIST

by the name of

WHITE BUFFALO

A.K.A. BOBBY HILL

1933-1984

This particular

ORIGINAL PAINTING

was drawn in

"1975"

This original painting is signed by

WHITE BUFFALO

KIOWA - '75

This original painting was obtained by a couple from Denver, Colorado who were longtime collectors of Indian Art. This Original Painting was obtained directly from Bobby Hill who used the name of White Buffalo as he signed his art and in the 1970's he was selling many of his original pieces of art at Indian Art Shows.

This is a great looking original painting that was done on mat board and it features a

INDIAN MAN

on his

HORSE

on a cold and windy snowy night

Then at the bottom right the artist signed his name

- WHITE BUFFALO-

KIOWA - '75

This painting has been surrounded by a

Brown and Blue Frame

and the framed piece measures

17" by 22"

The frame and piece of art has no glass on the front and it has never been behind glass. T is no dust cover on the back of the frame.

T are a few nicks in the frame. The piece of art has a few specks on the outside part of the mat board and some very minor dust stains on the outside mat board.

The middle part of the painted area remains in good shape. But, it must be noted that this original painting was stored for many years before the Denver Couple decided to sell their Indian Collection. And, the reason it collected a bit of dust. We believe all of the dust can be earily cleaned, but for fear of causing more stains, we will let the new owner clean off the surface dust which is minor. But otherwise it has been well preserved and protected over the years - since the early 1970's.

The Kiowa are a nation of Native Americans who lived mostly in north Texas , Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico at the time of the arrival of Europeans . Today the Kiowa Tribe is federally recognized, with about 12,000 members living in southwestern Oklahoma.

Kiowa artists are well known for a pictographic art form that is now referred to as "Plains Indian ledger art", and its contribution to the development of contemporary Native American art. The earliest of these Kiowa artists were those held in captivity by the US Army at Fort Marion in St. Augustine , Florida at the conclusion of the Southern Plains Indian war . Traditionally the artist's medium for their pictographic images were natural objects and animal skins, but for the Kiowa in captivity the lined pages of the white man's record keeping books became a popular substitute, thus the name "ledger art".

Twentieth century Kiowa artists include the Kiowa Five, a group of artists whom studied at the University of Oklahoma . The "Five" referred to are the male members of the group. The pictographic art form known as "ledger art" was an Indian art form which had historically been dominated by the male members of the plains culture. However, the "Five" actually had a sixth member, a woman named Lois Smokey . Another prolific and significant pre-Kiowa Five artisan during the early twentieth century was Silverhorn. Well known Kiowa artists of the later twentieth century include Bobby Hill (White Buffalo), Robert Redbird , Roland N. Whitehorse, and T. C. Cannon. The pictographic art of contemporary and traditional artist Sherman Chaddlesone has revived the ledger art form that was absent in most of the art of the Second Generation Modernists that had developed since Silverhorn and the Kiowa Five. Chaddlesone studied under Native American masters Allan Houser and Fritz Scholder and is considered a versatile an...

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