Albert King/Otis Rush: Door To Door-80's French LP

  • Sold for: Start FREE Trial! or Sign In to see what it's worth.
  • Item Category: Entertainment
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Jul 04,2011
  • Channel: Online Auction
Used Mid 80's French Import Analog Reissue of Classic 1969 Chess Release by Bandleaders/Composers/Left Handed Guitarists/Blues Vocalists Albert King and Otis Rush Entitled Door to Door, Album Supervision by Marshall Chess, Originally Produced by Leonard & Phil Chess, Engineered by Malcolm Chisholm, Vintage Series Compiled, Edited and Produced by T.T. Swan - "Albert King is truly a "King of the Blues," although he doesn't hold that title ( B.B . does). Along with B.B . and Freddie King , Albert King is one of the major influences on blues and rock guitar players. Without him, modern guitar music would not sound as it does -- his style has influenced both black and white blues players from Otis Rush and Robert Cray to Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan . It's important to note that while almost all modern blues guitarists seldom play for long without falling into a B.B. King guitar cliché, Albert King never does -- he's had his own style and unique tone from the beginning. Albert King plays guitar left-handed, without re-stringing the guitar from the right-handed setup; this "upside-down" playing accounts for his difference in tone, since he pulls down on the same strings that most players push up on when bending the blues notes. King 's massive tone and totally unique way of squeezing bends out of a guitar string has had a major impact. Many young white guitarists -- especially rock & rollers -- have been influenced by King 's playing, and many players who emulate his style may never have heard of Albert King , let alone heard his music. His style is immediately distinguishable from all other blues guitarists, and he's one of the most important blues guitarists to ever pick up the electric guitar. Born in Indianola, MS, but raised in Forrest City, AR, Albert King (born Albert Nelson ) taught himself how to play guitar when he was a child, building his own instrument out of a cigar box. At first, he played with gospel groups -- most notably the Harmony Kings -- but after hearing Blind Lemon Jefferson , Lonnie Johnson , and several other blues musicians, he solely played the blues. In 1950, he met MC Reeder, who owned the T-99 nightclub in Osceola, AR. King moved to Osceola shortly afterward, joining the T-99's house band, the In the Groove Boys. The band played several local Arkansas gigs besides the T-99, including several shows for a local radio station. After enjoying success in the Arkansas area, King moved to Gary, IN, in 1953, where he joined a band that also featured Jimmy Reed and John Brim . Both Reed and Brim were guitarists, which forced King to play drums in the group. At this time, he adopted the name Albert King , which he assumed after B.B. King 's "Three O'Clock Blues" became a huge hit. Albert met Willie Dixon shortly after moving to Gary, and the bassist/songwriter helped the guitarist set up an audition at Parrot Records. King passed the audition and cut his first session late in 1953. Five songs were recorded during the session and only one single, "Be on Your Merry Way" / "Bad Luck Blues," was released; the other tracks appeared on various compilations over the next four decades. Although it sold respectably, the single didn't gather enough attention to earn him another session with Parrot. In early 1954, King returned to Osceola and re-joined theIn the Groove Boys; he stayed in Arkansas for the next two years. In 1956, Albert moved to St. Louis, where he initially sat in with local bands. By the fall of 1956, King was headlining several clubs in the area. King continued to play the St. Louis circuit, honing his style. During these years, he began playing his signature Gibson Flying V, which he named Lucy. By 1958, Albert was quite popular in St. Louis, which led to a contract with the fledgling Bobbin Records in the summer of 1959. On his first Bobbin recordings, King recorded with a pianist and a small horn section, which made the music sound closer to jump blues than Delta or Chicago blues. Nevertheless, his guitar was taking a center stage and it was clear that he had developed a unique, forcef...

Items in the Worthopedia are obtained exclusively from licensors and partners solely for our members’ research needs.

Relevant Articles