Antique Kerr Economy Fruit Jars, 3 with lids

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  • Item Category: Glass
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: May 08,2011
  • Channel: Online Auction

Antique Kerr Economy Fruit Jars, 3 w/lids

Here are three really nice Kerr Economy one quart canning jars, complete with lids and retaining clips. These jars all have mold seams, which means they were made after 1915. All have some bubbles, waves and imperfections in the glass. They are marked on the bottom as a # 4, # 7, and # 3.

Lids are all the same, marked: Kerr Economy Jar Cap – for all methods of canning. Retaining clips have some corrosion.

The sides of the jars are marked Kerr Economy – Trademark…..but each is a little different from the other.

The bottoms are marked # 3 - Kerr Glass Mfg Co, Sand Springs Okla, Patented

# 4 - Kerr Glass Mfg Co, Sand Springs Okla, Patented

# 7 - Kerr Glass Mfg Corp, Sand Springs OK

GREAT COLLECTIBLES!

Sold as is, no returns. Shipped parcel post unless otherwise requested. Check my feedback, I am a good packer!

Will combine shipping, so check my other sales. I have other items listed.

No international sales.

SOME HISTORY: Clamped Glass-Lid Jars (Lightning Jars)

In 1882, Henry William Putnam of Bennington, Vermont, invented a fruit jar that used a glass lid and a metal clamp to hold the lid in place. These "Lightning jars" became popular because no metal (which could rust, breaking the seal or contaminating the food) contacted the food and the metal clamps made the lids themselves easier to seal and remove (hence the "Lightning" name).

Alexander H. Kerr founded the Hermetic Fruit Jar Company in 1903 and among the first commercial products were the Economy and Self Sealing jars. The Economy jars were the first wide-mouth jars, and easy to fill. They also incorporated aspects from two 1903 patents held by another inventor, Julius Landsberger: a metal lid with a permanently attached gasket. This made the lids easy to use and inexpensive.

Mr. Kerr later (1915) invented a smaller, flat metal disk with the same permanent composition gasket. The lid sealed on the top of a mason jar; a threaded metal ring held the lid down during the hot water processing. This allowed re-use of old canning jars together with inexpensive and easy to use disposable lids. The jar we know today was born! This two-part lid system transformed home canning safety and is still in use today.

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