British Original Comic Art. Terry-Thomas. Film Fun. Roy Wilson.

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  • Item Category: Books, Paper & Magazines
  • Source: eBay UK
  • Sold Date: Feb 22,2012
  • Channel: Online Auction
Original pen and ink artwork by ROY WILSON for 'Terry-Thomas' in FILM FUN.
Complete page. Dated 21 January (probably 1960).
On four strips of card. Total page size is 64cm x 53cm.
Terry tries to raise cash but nobody wants to see his house!

Roy Wilson (1900-1965) was oneof the finest artists ever to work for British comics. He contributed to Amalgamated Press/Fleetway/IPC weeklies for 45 years (1920-1965). Wilson was born in Kettering Northamptonshire and the family (he had three younger brothers and a sister) later moved to Norwich. During the 1914-1918 war he was a Junior Draughtsman on the Air Board Staff; shortly after the Armistice he was demobbed. In 1920 he met Don Newhouse an established comics artist and he became Newhouse’s assistant; a relationship that continued for most of the decade. Later Wilson was introduced to Len Stroud who was editor of MERRY & BRIGHT. Stroud recognised his superior talent and persuaded him to submit work under his own name rather than that of Newhouse. The result was that from then on and throughout the 1930s Wilson became the leading artist of the AP humour comics, his art usually appearing on the front page as well as the inside pages. Titles his work appeared in included BUTTERFLY, FUNNY WONDER, CRACKERS, JINGLES, SPARKLER, GOLDEN and HAPPY DAYS. During the 1939-1945 war he was a member of the Home Guard. Throughout the 1940s his work appeared in WONDER (“Private Muggins” – which related to his experiences in the Home Guard, RADIO FUN (“Stymie and His Magic Wishbone”) and TIP TOP (“Happy Andy”). In the 1950s he drew ‘personality’ sets for T.V. FUN and FILM FUN. His last was “Morecombe and Wise” in BUSTER. Roy Wilson died of cancer in June, 1965. Roy Wilson brought quality and class to British comics. He was the most influential artist of his time and was the finest of all the pre-war comic artists. His wife was thriller writer G.M. Wilson (1899-1986). She was also a contributor to comics from 1932-1956: she wrote Roy Keen stories for BUTTERFLY and the Inspector Stanley and Jane X stories for RADIO FUN.

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