Coal Mine Miners Mining Geo. Anton Tin Oil Lamp yqz

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  • Item Category: Tools
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Jan 30,2007
  • Channel: Online Auction
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Coal Mine Miners Mining Geo. Anton Tin Oil Lamp
This is a nice old sunshine lamp which was used for a coal miner's light source prior to the development of the carbide lamp. It burned sunshine oil. This lamp has a shield and eagle on the side and says " Geo. Anton Monongahela City" The lamp is about 2 3/4" high to the top of the spout. It is in excellent condition though lightly scratched overall. The shield and writing are readable with a scope. It has its original wick and it has a double walled spout , cool!! For those not familiar with miner's lamps, is some history behind this type of lamp from off the internet:
A small wick lamp with a spout resembling a tiny teapot was invented in Scotland in about 1850. These lamps burned lard type oil. They were dangerous with their open flame but saw use for many years. The small "pot" portion of the lamp (about 2 inches tall) held the fuel. A hinged cap sealed over the top and snapped it shut. A long spout of several inches contained the wick and extended up and out from one side of the pot. On the opposite side from the spout was a hook used to attach the lamp to the miner's leather or cloth cap. These little lamps found their way to the US when miners emigrating from the British Isles brought them with them.
A wick was used to bring the fuel from the pot to the tip of the spout w it burned with a very smoky flame. The fuel was usually some type of lard, bacon grease, or tallow compound. It was common for the miner to burn whatever was cheap or on hand. In later years the miners adapted their lamps to burn "sunshine" oil which was a mixture of paraffin wax and mineral oil.
Miners found advantages in the oil wick lamp. They were cheaper and longer burning than tallow candles and the were very light weight. These tiny spout lamps were produced in many sizes by a number of manufacturers in the eastern United States and used primarily in the eastern coal mines. They did find their way west and they were used in the Mt Diablo Coal Fields in Northern California. These "teapot" lamps were phased out much like the candlestick with the advent of carbide lamps for mining use.
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