2 COPPER SPANISH PIRATE COBS__Colonial America__ORIGINAL TREASURE COINS__1600's

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  • Item Category: Coins & Currency
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Nov 23, 2014
  • Channel: Auction House
5S51

FRASCATIUS ANCIENTS

2 BEAUTIFUL COPPER SPANISH PIRATE COBS OF PHILIP III – PHILIP IV FROM THE 16TH – 17TH CENTURY AD.

MINTED IN SPAIN & COLONIAL AMERICA - INDIVIDUALLY STRUCK BY HAND

WITH ORIGINAL "AS-FOUND" DIRT & PATINA

THE COINS IN THE PHOTOS ARE THE EXACT COINS YOU WILL RECEIVE

THE SIZES ARE 23.1 MM AND 2.4 GRAMS & 22.3 MM AND 2.7 GRAMS.

Cobs are the original "treasure coins." Struck and trimmed by hand in the 16th through 18th centuries at Spanish mints in Mexico, Peru, and Colombia (among others). Some cobs were struck with a date, and most show a mintmark and an initial or monogram for the assayer, the mint official who was responsible for weight and fineness. Size and shape were immaterial, which means that most cobs are far from round or uniform in thickness. Cobs were generally accepted as good currency all around the world.

The crude coins, called "cobs" (from the Spanish word cabo), produced were hand-struck, irregularly shaped objects of various denominations in silver, copper, and gold. Weight and fineness were primary considerations in coin production: after the metal was smelted, purified, and alloyed (this last to prevent brittleness), large strips were measured for proper thickness and cut into basic sizes corresponding to their denominations . Further

The hand-hammered dies used in the colonial Americas had short life spans, necessitating constant replacement. This condition in conjunction with later vandalisms resulted in myriad discrepancies found among coins of all denominations, confusing our modern identification of a given coin's value, date, and the precise location of its facture. Even as technologies in the Spanish-American colonies were not sufficiently sophisticated to produce uniformly round coins until the eighteenth century, the process was surprisingly efficient.

PHILIP IV OF SPAIN

The peak of Spanish power is usually dated with the reign of King Philip II, yet in terms of the size of the Spanish Empire, that peak was reached during the reign of his successor King Philip IV. He reigned at a crucial time. After the death of the dominant Philip II, Spain is generally considered to have gone into decline due to the often unscrupulous ministers (especially the Duke of Lerma) who dominated the country during the reign of Philip III. When it came time for his son to take the throne he was pulled in opposite directions and went back and forth between the noninvolvement of his father and the quality of his grandfather.

Philip IV was born on April 8, 1605 in Valladolid to King Philip III and Margaret of Austria. When he was only ten years old he married Isabella of France in 1615. The couple had seven children, 6 girls and 1 boy who sadly died in 1646 when he was only 16-years-old. Despite being pushed toward temptation in many ways, King Philip IV corresponded with Venerable Mary of Agreda; a Spanish mystic who advised him on how to be good Catholic monarch. Yet, he was not always a hard enough man to bear the burdens of his office and found diversion in riding, hunting, the theatre and being a great patron of the arts. He also, like his father, placed a great deal of power in the hands of his chief minister the Duke of Olivares. Thankfully, however, Olivares was a more noble man than Lerma had been. However, Queen Isabella and a clique of powerful nobles managed to have Olivares removed in 1643 and she became a much more dominant figure until her own death the following year.

Still wishing to maintain the Austrian alliance, in 1646 King Philip IV married Maria Anna of Austria, his niece and the daughter of the Hapsburg Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand II. Yet, Philip still had trouble producing an heir with his only surviving son of six p...

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