GENUINE VINTAGE "FLIPPO" THE CLOWN, CHANNEL 10 OHIO

HEY KIDDIES, IT'S "FLIPPO" THE CLOWN, SEEN DAILY ON CHANNEL 10 IN COLUMBUS OHIO MANY YEARS AGO. IT'S FRAMED OF COURSE BUT NOTHING SPECIAL, JUST OLD. PICTURE IS IN GREAT SHAPE.

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Farewell, Flippo

Bob Marvin will be remembered for his music, his wit and his role in the community

Tuesday, June 13, 2006

Central Ohio mourns the passing of a consummate entertainer, a gifted jazzman and a sophisticated wit who found his true calling wearing white greasepaint and a red nose. Marvin Fishman, whose professional name was Bob Marvin but who was best known as Flippo the Clown, died Saturday at 79.

Flippo came into being in 1952 as part of the national craze of children?s clown shows. But Marvin?s real shtick and the source of his threedecade staying power was a comic sensibility that cracked up college students and hipsters, yet delighted children and left their parents comfortable that the kids were being safely entertained.

The self-proclaimed King of the Clowns, for all his big, floppy collar and baggy suit trimmed with white pom-poms, wasn?t a circus-style clown. He employed just enough slapstick, including the occasional practical joke on a TV-studio crew member, to keep things lively. But he is most remembered for the mischievous wisecracks with which he peppered the breaks during films, shown weekday afternoons on The Early Show.

Flippo?s daily show was enough to provide thousands of people who grew up in central Ohio in the 1950s, ?60s and ?70s with memories of watching the show or, if they were industrious or lucky enough, actually appearing on it.

But his contributions to the community went beyond the movie show.

He first caught the attention of producers from WBNS-TV (Channel 10) while he was an Ohio State student, playing tenor saxophone in a band at the Neil House hotel. And he never lost his love of the instrument. He was a founding member of the OSU Jazz Forum and led his own band for 35 years.

His celebrity lent extra luster to countless community festivals and charity events.

His last public appearance, fittingly, was to be honored in January by the Ohio Historical Society for his place in local history and for having donated his Flippo costume, along with photographs, a makeup kit, a 1971 script and other memorabilia, to the society?s museum.

He?ll live on just as vividly in the fond memories of thousands of viewers around the country.

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