LOT OF 5 TOM MIX SILENT FILM COWBOY PHOTOGRAPHS RARE NR

ITEM: You are bidding on a scarce original early antique 1st generation lot of 4 photographs and one postcard of silent film cowboy Tom Mix, in a variety of posed candids and action shots. These measure between 3 1/2" x 5 1/2" and 5 1/2" x 7 1/2" and very rare Hollywood treasure that sells no reserve. We have come into a wonderful collection of old Hollywood photos, we are happy to offer them and we will ship multiples for no further cost. CONDITION: This lot is in very good-fine condition overall and displays wonderfully overall with some handling wear. It is lovely and well preserved when viewed, this is a wonderful piece of memorabilia; 100% guaranteed vintage and original.
YIKES I HAVE A COME INTO A GREAT UNUSUAL COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL SILENT MOVIE AND EARLY TALKIE ERA HOLLYWOOD MOVIE STILLS, HAND SIGNED AUTOGRAPHED, THEY ALL SELL IN THE COMING WEEKS ON EBAY IN A NO RESERVE AUCTION FORMAT ALONG WITH AN ASSORTMENT OF PIN UP, PAPER, ART DECO COLLECTIBLES, AND ANTIQUE CALENDARS AND PRINTS WHICH WE AT GRAPEFRUITMOONGALLERY ARE HAPPY TO OFFER TO YOU OUR BIDDERS GOOD LUCK AND ENJOY, THESE ARE FABULOUS!
Mini Biography The son of a lumberman, Tom Mix joined the army as a young man and was an artillery sergeant during the Philippine campaign from 1898 to 1901, though he never saw action. In fact, Mix deserted from the Army and carefully kept the facts about his military service a closely guarded secret. About 1903 he was drum major with the Oklahoma Cavalry Band, playing in the St. Louis World's Fair. In 1904 he was a bartender and sheriff-marshal in Dewey, Oklahoma. He was in a series of Wild West shows, such as The Miller bros. Wild West Show from 1906-1909; the Widerman show in Amarillo, Texas; with wife Olive Mix in Seattle's Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition; and Will A. Dickey's Circle D Ranch. The latter supplied Selig Pictures with cowboys and Indians for movies and, in 1910, Mix was hired by Selig to provide and handle horses. His first movie was Ranch Life in the Great Southwest (1910). He continued with Selig until 1917, writing and directing as well as acting. He was signed by Fox Films in 1917 and remained with them until 1928, averaging five or so films a year. His popularity eclipsed all other great cowboy stars (Hoot Gibson and even the legendary William S. Hart) of the silent era and he earned--- and spent--- millions. In addition to Mix's riding and shooting skills, the films also showcased the talents of his amazing horse, Tony the Horse. Sound and encroaching middle age were not favorable to Mix, and after making a handful of pictures during the sound era he left the film industry after 1935's serial, The Miracle Rider (1935) (a huge hit for lowly Mascot Pictures, grossing over $1 million--- Mix earned $40,000), touring with the Sells Floto Circus in 1930 and 1931 and the Tom Mix Circus from 1936 to 1938. While Mix was a great showman, the combination of the Depression and the high cost of overhead conspired against his success. He died in an auto accident in 1940. Tom Mix developed a comical style, emphasized fast action thrills to a greater extent than had been common in earlier westerns, and did his own stunts. He was king of the cowboys during the 1920s and remained popular on radio and in comic books for more than a decade after his death. IMDb Mini Biography By: Ed Stephan

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