Marx Electric Train and Village Set

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  • Item Category: Toys, Dolls, Games & Puzzles
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Mar 25,2012
  • Channel: Online Auction

Marx Electric Train and Village Set

This listing is for Marx Electric Train and Village Set. Set is as shown in the photo's. This is mine from when I was a child. I dont know if the transformer or engine works. Comes with some extra track pieces and everything shown in the photos. Please as any questions you may have before you purchase. Will ship UPS. USA ONLY unless youre willing to pay actual shipping charges for international UPS shipping. Louis Marx and Company was an American toy manufacturer in business from 1919 to 1978. Its products were often imprinted with the slogan, "One of the many Marx toys, have you all of them?" History A popular American manufacturer of toys and trains founded in 1919 by brothers Louis and David Marx, which usually supplied the price niche below Lionel and Flyer, making it popular with those who couldn't afford those brands. Marx train production started in 1934 with the purchase of Joy Line trains. Marx toys is one of the most recognized, respected and popular names among today's antique toy collectors. Louis Marx, was born in Brooklyn, NY, in 1896. At the age of sixteen, Marx began working for F. J. Strauss Company, a toy manufacturer that produced items for Abraham & Strauss Department Stores. His energy and enthusiasm helped him to become a manager by the time he was twenty. In 1919, Marx had a falling out with Strauss. Deciding that it was time to venture out on his own, he established Louis Marx & Co., and set up office at 200 Fifth Avenue, in New York City. Marx started his company with virtually nothing. He had no money, machinery, products, patents, or customers, but what he lacked in resources, he more than made up for in seemingly endless energy and determination. He wasted no time and started contracting with manufacturers to produce toys that he designed. His brother David decided to join him a couple of years later. Louis had the business, designing, and marketing skills, and David was the man behind the operations. The two of them together would grow to be the world's largest toy manufacturer. Marx boxes were imprinted with the slogan, "One of the many Marx toys, have you all of them?" The Marx logo consisted of the letters "MAR" in a circle with a large X through it, resembling a railroad crossing sign. Because of this, Marx toys are sometimes misidentified as "Mar" toys. Marx's toys included tinplate buildings, toy soldiers, toy dinosaurs, mechanical toys, toy guns, action figures, dolls, doll houses, toy cars, and after the acquisition of Joy Line, HO scale and 'O' scale toy trains. Marx's less-expensive toys were extremely common in dime stores, and its larger, costlier toys were staples for catalog retailers such as Sears and Montgomery Ward, especially around Christmas time. Although the company is now largely forgotten except by toy collectors, several of its toys remain well known. Rock'em Sock'em Robots, introduced in the 1960's, remained popular for years and has been reintroduced by several different companies. Its last hurrah was the Big Wheel ride-on pedal toy, which was introduced in 1969 and became one of the most popular toys of the 1970's. The company's basic policies were "Give the customer more toy for less money," and "Quality is not negotiable," which made the company highly successful. Initially the company had no product designs and no manufacturing capacity, so Marx raised money by positioning itself as a middle man, studying available products, finding ways to make them cheaper, and then closing a sale. Funds raised from these efforts proved sufficient to purchase tooling for two obsolete tin toys—called the Alabama Minstrel Dancer and Zippo the Climbing Monkey—from toymaker Ferdinand Strauss, one of Louis Marx's former employers. With subtle changes, Marx was able to turn these toys into hits, selling more than 8 million of each within two years. Marx then bought the company it had subcontracted to manufacture the toys. By 1921, they were able to start independently producing toys from their own designs. By 1922, both Louis and David...

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