MICKEY MANTLE~TOPPS STERLING QUAD GU DUAL JSY/BAT~02/10

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  • Item Category: Sports
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Feb 25,2008
  • Channel: Online Auction

YOU ARE BIDDING ON A 2006 TOPPS STERLING CUTS QUAD GAME WORN JERSEY with PINSTRIPE & GAME USED BAT BASEBALL CARD

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FEATURING LEGEND & HALL OF FAMER

MICKEY MANTLE

SERIAL #: MM~HR67

SUPER RARE OPPORTUNITY

ONLY 10 EXIST.. .

Mickey Mantle Mickey Mantle When Mantle was originally signed by the Yankees, he was a shortstop. Center fielder Born: October 20 , 1931 (1931-10-20 ) Died: August 13 , 1995 (aged 63) Batted: Switch Threw: Right MLB debut April 17 , 1951
for the New York Yankees Final game September 28 , 1968
for the New York Yankees Career statistics Batting average .298 Home runs 536 Hits 2415 Teams New York Yankees ( 1951 -1968 ) Career highlights and awards AL MVP (1956, 1957, & 1962) AL Triple Crown (1956) AL Gold Glove winner in (1962) 16-time AL All-Star (1952-1965, 1967, 1968) Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame Elected 1974 Vote 88.2% (first ballot)

Mickey Charles Mantle ( October 20 , 1931 - August 13 , 1995 ) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974.

He played his entire 18-year major-league professional career for the New York Yankees , winning 3 American League MVP titles and playing for 16 All-Star teams. Mantle played on 12 pennant winners and 7 World Championship clubs. He still holds the records for most World Series home runs (18), RBIs (40), runs (42), walks (43), extra-base hits (26), and total bases (123).

Youth

Mickey Mantle was born in Spavinaw, Oklahoma . He was named in honor of Mickey Cochrane , the Hall of Fame catcher from the Philadelphia Athletics, by his father, who was an amateur player and fervent fan. Apparently his father was not aware that Cochrane's real first name was Gordon. According to the book Mickey Mantle: America's Prodigal Son, by Tony Castro, in later life, Mickey expressed relief that his father had not known this, as he would have hated to be named Gordon. Mantle always spoke warmly of his father, and said he was the bravest man he ever knew. "No boy ever loved his father more," he said. His father died of cancer at the age of 39, just as his son was starting his career. Mantle said one of the great heartaches of his life was that he never told his father he loved him.

When Mantle was four years old, the family moved to the nearby town of Commerce, Oklahoma . Mantle was an all-around athlete at Commerce High School , playing basketball as well as football (he was offered a football scholarship by the University of Oklahoma ) in addition to his first love, baseball . His football playing nearly ended his athletic career, and indeed his life. Kicked in the shin during a game, Mantle's leg soon became infected with osteomyelitis , a crippling disease that would have been incurable just a few years earlier. A midnight ride to Tulsa, Oklahoma , enabled Mantle to be treated with newly available penicillin , saving his leg from amputation . He suffered from the effects of the disease for the rest of his life, and it probably led to many other injuries that hampered his accomplishments. Additionally, Mantle's osteomyelitic condition exempted him from military service , which caused him to become very unpopular with fans, (Castro 2002:61-70) as his earliest days in baseball coincided with the Korean War (though he was still selected as an all-star the year his medical exemption was given, and was known as the "fastest man to first base.") This unpopularity, mainly with older fans, dramatically reversed after he finished second to Roger Maris in the pursuit of Babe Ruth 's home run record in 1961.

Professional career

Mickey had played shortstop in the minor leagues. His first semi-professional team was the Baxter Springs (Kan.) Whiz Kids. In 1948, Yankees' scout Tom Greenwade came to Baxter Springs to watch Mickey's teammate, third baseman Billy Johnson, in a Whiz Kids game. During the game Mickey hit two homers, one righty and one lefty, into a river well past the ballpark's fences....

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