Petrus Scriverius. Principes Hollandiæ, Zelandiæ et Westfrisiæ

Petrus Scriverius. Principes Hollandiæ, Zelandiæ et Westfrisiæ. Haarlem. Pieter Soutman, 1650. First edition. Folio (approximately 21.5 x 14 inches). [2, blank], [4], [126], [2, blank] pages. Complete with engraved title, 38 engraved portraits, and one plate of the coat-of-arms of Haarlem, with the city in the background. Contemporary full vellum, covers paneled in gilt with gilt central floral medallion and gilt floral cornerpieces. Binding soiled and worn, with spine mostly perished, text worn at edges, plates browned and somewhat worn. Shaken. Good condition.

Petrus Scriverius (Latinized form of Pieter Schrijver or Schryver, 1576-1660) was an important Dutch writer and scholar who lived in Leiden studying classical literature and the history of the Netherlands. He is best remembered for his histories of the Netherlands and of particular provinces, including the present work. "...The Batavian myth that formed the foundation for Holland's identity was above all a provincial myth, with almost ethnic features. Medieval history was also given a distinctly provincial slant in Holland. Precisely in the year 1650 the Leiden scholar Petrus Scriverius, whose earlier Old Batavia Now Called Holland had given a strongly pro-Holland interpretation of the story of the Batavian origin of the Dutch population, published a monumental and royally illustrated Principes Hollandiae, et. ...(Haarlem, 1650), a revised version of the history of the Counts of Holland from Dirk I to Philip II. For Scriverius the Holland counts and their province were the natural successors of the Batavian people." (-Willem Frijhoff, Dutch Culture in a Euriopean Perspective, 1650.) This book is a beautiful collection of engraved portraits and histories of the most important citizens of the Netherlands. Some portraits after Jan Van Eyck, Rubens, or Lucas van Leyden. Grade: 0, Service No.: 0

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