Rare1881 Las Vegas NEW MEXICO newspaper w BILLY THE KID

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  • Item Category: Ethnic, Folk & Native American Art
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Oct 29,2007
  • Channel: Online Auction

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SEE PHOTO----- COMPLETE and very rare ORIGINAL newspaper, the Las vegas Daily Gazette (NEW MEXICO) dated July 10, 1881. In 1881 Las Vegas (NM) was the principal town in the area that the famed (or infamous) New Mexico outlaw, BILLY THE KID, lived. Las Vegas, NM was the closest railroad station to the New Mexico frontier towns in which Billy the Kid was active. On July 10, 1881 Billy the Kid was still on the run from local Sheriff PAT GARRETT after the Kid shot and killed 2 lawmen and escaped from custody while waiting to tbe hung for murder in Lincoln, NM.

Billy the Kid would be shot and killed by Pat Garrett on July 14, 1881 at Ft Sumner, NM.

This rare Las Vegas newspaper has an inside page ad that has an illustration of a building in town of Las Vegas in 1881, while Billy the Kid was still at large. See Las Vegas, NM as Billy the Kid saw it in 1881 - and in the LOCAL newspaper !!!

Henry McCarty ( November 23 , 1859 - July 14 , 1881 ) was better known as Billy the Kid, but also known by the aliases Henry Antrim and William Harrison Bonney. He was a 19th century American frontier outlaw and gunman who was a participant in the Lincoln County War . According to legend he killed 21 men, one for each year of his life.

Billy the Kid.

In November 1880, a posse pursued and trapped McCarty's gang inside a ranch-house (owned by friend James Greathouse at Anton Chico in the White Oaks area). A posse member named James Carlysle ventured into the house under white flag in an attempt to negotiate the group's surrender, with Greathouse being sent out as a hostage for the posse. At some point in the night it became apparent to Carlysle that the outlaws were stalling, when suddenly a shot was accidentally fired from outside. Carlysle, assuming the posse members had shot Greathouse, decided to run for his life, crashing through a window into the snow outside. As he did so, the posse, mistaking Carlysle for one of the gang, fired and killed him. Realizing what they had done and now demoralized, the posse scattered, allowing McCarty and his gang to slip away. McCarty later wrote to Governor Wallace claiming innocence in the killing of Carlysle and of involvement in cattle rustling in general.

Pat Garrett A photograph of Sheriff Pat Garrett.

During this time, the Kid also developed a friendship with an ambitious local bartender and former buffalo hunter named Pat Garrett . Running on a pledge to rid the area of rustlers, Garrett was elected as sheriff of Lincoln County in November 1880, and in early December he put together a posse and set out to arrest McCarty, now known almost exclusively as Billy the Kid, and carrying a $500 bounty on his head.

The posse led by Garrett fared much better, and his men closed in quickly. On December 19 , McCarty barely escaped the posse's midnight ambush in Fort Sumner, during which one of McCarty's gang, Tom O'Folliard , was shot and killed. On December 23 , he was tracked to an abandoned stone building located in a remote location called Stinking Springs.

While McCarty and his gang were asleep inside, Garrett's posse surrounded the building and waited for sunrise. The next morning, a cattle rustler named Charlie Bowdre stepped outside to feed his horse. Mistaken for McCarty, he was killed by the posse. Soon afterward somebody from within the building reached for the horse's halter rope, but Garrett shot and killed the horse. (The horse's body then blocked the only exit.) As the lawmen began to cook breakfast over an open fire, Garrett and McCarty engaged in a friendly exchange, with Garrett inviting McCarty outside to eat, and McCarty inviting Garrett to "go to hell." Realizing that they had no hope of escape, the besieged and hungry outlaws finally surrendered later that day and were allowed to join in the...

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