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RUSH ~ 5 COOL OLD RARE CLASSIC ROCK 8-TRACK TAPES!
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RUSH ~ 5 COOL OLD RARE CLASSIC ROCK 8-TRACK TAPES!

Sold For: 

Sold Date: 08/05/2013
Channel: Online Auction
Source: eBay



RUSH
5 DIFFERENT COOL OLD * TRACK TAPES
CARESS OF STEEL
FAREWELL TO KINGS
RUSH ARCHIVES
ALL THE WORLD’S A STAGE
SOME CLASSIC VINTAGE ROCK!
NICE COLLECTION OF RUSH 8-TRACK TAPES

We've been cleaning out all of my old 'stuff' from my parents home and I ran across these cool old vintage 8-Tracks from the band Rush that I thought someone would like.

You are bidding on a group of 5 8-track tapes that include the following albums
CARESS OF STEEL
FAREWELL TO KINGS
RUSH ARCHIVES
ALL THE WORLD’S A STAGE

With an unmistakable sound melding Geddy Lee's freakishly high-pitched vocals, Alex Lifeson's high-cholesterol guitar heroics and Neil Peart's ultra-complex drumming, this Canadian power trio are one of the most beloved progressive rock bands ever.

THIS IS WHAT THE ROCK & ROLL HALL OF FAME SAYS ABOUT RUSH
Equal parts Led Zeppelin, Cream and King Crimson, Rush burst out of Canada in the early 1970s with one of the most powerful and bombastic sounds of the decade. Their 1976 magnum opus 2112 represents progressive rock at its grandiose heights, but just a half decade later they had the guts to put epic songs aside in favor of shorter (but no less dynamic) tunes like “Tom Sawyer” and “The Spirit of Radio” that remain in constant rotation on radio to this day. Absolutely uncompromising in every conceivable way, the trio has spent the last 40 years cultivating the largest cult fan base in rock while still managing to sell out arenas around the globe.

Rush was formed in August 1968 in the Willowdale neighborhood of Toronto. The original lineup included Alex Lifeson on guitar, Jeff Jones on bass and John Rutsey on drums. Jones was soon replaced by Geddy Lee, and, in 1974, after the release of the group’s debut album, Rutsey left and was replaced by Neil Peart. That lineup – Lee on vocals, bass and keyboards; Lifeson on guitar, and Peart on drums – has remained stable throughout the years.

The group played around on the Toronto scene for a few years and then, in 1973, released its first single, a cover of Buddy Holly’s “Not Fade Away.” The record didn’t do well, and the band decided to form its own label, Moon Records. The group released its first album, Rush, in 1974.

The following year, Rush released two albums, Fly by Night and Caress of Steel. The group’s big breakthrough came the following year with the release of the album 2112. The album featured a 20-minute title track divided into seven sections. It went platinum in Canada, and Rush hit the road, touring the U.S. and Canada. The tour culminated with a three-night stand at Massey Hall in Toronto. The group recorded the shows and released its first live album, All the World’s a Stage, in 1976.

Rush then re-located to the U.K., where the band recorded its next two albums, 1977’s A Farewell to Kings and 1978’s Hemispheres, at Rockfield Studios in Wales. The music on those two albums ventured more in the direction of progressive rock.

Rush’s popularity continued to soar, and in 1980, with the release of Permanent Waves, the group became one of the most successful bands in the world. The album marked something of a change in the group’s sound. The songs were shorter, and the group’s influences now included reggae and New Wave. Permanent Waves reached the Top Five in the U.S. The following year Rush released Moving Pictures. That album reached Number Three and sold more than four million copies.

With the release of Signals in 1982, Rush’s sound underwent yet another change. Synthesizers were now at the forefront of the group’s music. In addition, the album included Rush’s only Top 40 hit single in the U.S., “New World Man.” The album also expanded the band’s use of ska, reggae and funk.

Through the rest of the Eighties, the band kept a somewhat lower profile, not spending as much time on the road. Even so, its albums continued to go gold or platinum. With the 1989 album Presto, Rush once again began emphasizing guitar instead of keyboards. The transition from synthesizer to guitar conti...

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