Signed Oliver Lodge British Scientist Physicist 1800s

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  • Item Category: Books, Paper & Magazines
  • Source: eBay UK
  • Sold Date: Jun 20,2011
  • Channel: Online Auction
Oliver Joseph Lodge Signed Album Page Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge
Vanity Fair cartoon . Born 12 June 1851 ( 1851-06-12 )
Penkhull , Staffordshire Died 22 August 1940 ( 1940-08-23 ) (aged 89)
Lake , Wiltshire Occupation Physicist and inventor

Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge , FRS (12 June 1851 – 22 August 1940) was a British physicist and writer involved in the development of key patents in wireless telegraphy . In his 1894 Royal Institution lectures (" The Work of Hertz and Some of His Successors "), Lodge coined the term " coherer " for the device invented by the Italian physicist Temistocle Calzecchi Onesti . In 1898 he was awarded the " syntonic " (or tuning) patent by the United States Patent Office. He was also credited by Lorentz (1895) [2 ] with the first published description of the length contraction hypothesis, in 1893, though in fact Lodge's friend George Francis FitzGerald had first suggested the idea in print in 1889.

Life

Oliver Lodge was born in 1851 at Penkhull in Stoke-on-Trent and educated at Adams' Grammar School . He was the eldest of eight sons and a daughter of Oliver Lodge (1826–1884) - later a ball clay merchant at Wolstanton , Staffordshire - and his wife, Grace, née Heath (1826–1879). Sir Oliver's siblings included Sir Richard Lodge (1855–1936), historian; Eleanor Constance Lodge (1869–1936), historian and principal of Westfield College , London; and Alfred Lodge (1854–1937), mathematician.

In 1865, Lodge, at the age of 14, entered his father's business (Oliver Lodge & Son) as an agent for B. Fayle & Co selling Purbeck blue clay to the potteries, travelling as far as Scotland. He continued to assist his father until he reached the age of 22. His father's wealth obtained from selling Purbeck ball clay enabled Lodge to attend physics lectures in London and attend the local Wedgwood Institute.

Lodge obtained a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of London in 1875 and a Doctor of Science in 1877. He was appointed professor of physics and mathematics at University College, Liverpool in 1881. In 1900 Lodge moved from Liverpool back to the Midlands and became the first principal of the new Birmingham University , remaining there until his retirement in 1919. He oversaw the start of the move of the university from Edmund Street in the city centre to its present Edgbaston campus. Lodge was awarded the Rumford Medal of the Royal Society in 1898 and was knighted by King Edward VII in 1902. In 1928 he was made Freeman of his native city, Stoke-on-Trent.

Lodge married Mary Fanny Alexander Marshall at St George's church, Newcastle-under-Lyme in 1877. They had twelve children, six boys and six girls: Oliver William Foster (1878–1955), Francis Brodie (1880–1967), Alec (1881–1938), Lionel (1883–1948), Noel (1885–1962), Violet (1888–1924), Raymond (1889–1915), Honor (1891–1979), Lorna (1892–1987), Norah (1894–1990), Barbara (1896–1983), and Rosalynde (1896–1983). Four of his sons went into business using Lodge's inventions. Brodie and Alec created the Lodge Plug Company, which manufactured sparking plugs for cars and aeroplanes. Lionel and Noel founded a company that produced an electrostatic device for cleaning factory and smelter smoke in 1913, called the Lodge Fume Deposit Company Limited (changed in 1919 to Lodge Fume Company Limited and in 1922, through agreement with the International Precipitation Corporation of California, to Lodge Cottrell Ltd ). Oliver , the eldest son, became a poet and author.

After his retirement in 1920, Sir Oliver and Lady Lodge settled in Normanton House, near Lake in Wiltshire , just a few miles from Stonehenge . Lodge and his wife are buried at St. Michael’s Church, Wilsford (Lake), Wiltshire. Their eldest son Oliver and eldest daughter Violet are buried at the same church.

Accomplishments

Maxwell's " Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism " appeared in 1873 and by 1876 Lodge was studying it intently. But he was fairly limited in mathematical physics both by aptitude and training and his first two papers were a des...

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