Spanish Colonial Conquistador Side Saddle Stirrup Brass

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  • Item Category: Ethnic, Folk & Native American Art
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Jun 29,2007
  • Channel: Online Auction
SPANISH COLONIAL CONQUISTADOR STIRRUP SINGLE SIDESADDLE

THIS MEASURES 9 INCHES X 3 INCHES X 4 INCHES , WEIGHT 1.5 POUNDS AND ARE MADE OF BRASS

RARE, ORIGINAL, AUTHENTIC, ANTIQUE, SPANISH, STIRRUPS - This style of Stirrup is generally referred to by antique-dealers, auction houses, and others as 'Conquistador Stirrups' - - This Authentic, Antique, Spanish Stirrups show wear commensurate with age & use, yet remain in Nice Condition... and This Will make an Excellent Addition for Your Collection, Display or a Fantastic Gift!!! **** NO RESERVE!!

The History of Stirrups: In most civilizations the horse was used more in chariots than for riding until about 800 BC. Before stirrups most equestrian cultures used no support for the feet at all. T are records of a loose surcingle being employed behind the girth, into which the feet could be tucked. Toe stirrups (loops of rope which held the big toe) were first recorded in Northern India in the 2nd century BC, their use was somewhat limited by climate and footwear. The first stirrups designed to take the entire foot were probably single mounting stirrups recorded in China in the 4th Century AD. The mounting stirrup was easier than using a stool to mount and safer than vaulting on when fully armed (Cambyses, king of Persia stabbed himself while mounting when fully armed in 522 BC - A.D.H.Bivar, "The Stirrup and Its Origins." Oriental Arts, n.s. 1 (1955): 61-68. ) Paired stirrups were first recorded in the 4th Century AD on a Chinese pottery horse and a stirrup has been found in a 4th Century Chinese grave. Their use spread through Central Asia and into Europe by the 8th century AD. The stirrup revolutionized riding and warfare. It allowed cavalry to ride further and faster, heavy cavalry and the use of lances developed, as did light cavalry and mounted archers. It was in Byzantine times when some elements like the saddle, stirrups, spurs, bits and bridles became popular and their use spread throughout Europe. This style of Stirrup most likely evolved in Europe during the days of Knights & Cavaliers. The use of these devices helped the rider achieve greater stability as well as a means to mount and dismount the horse with relative ease. This fact was especially crucial when the rider was wearing heavy armor in which the weight of the metal would be enough to topple him off the horse. The use of enclosed stirrups served the purpose of providing a firm, solid base platform for the Horseman to stand up in while wielding his own sword, charging with lance, or shooting arrows. while also providing armour to the feet of the rider. It has been said that the Spanish Conquistadors brought this type of Stirrup as part of their horse equipment to the New-World. Others state that these Stirrups were produced in the 'New World' after the Conquistador arrived. This type of Stirrup was made of bronze or brass to help prevent rusting.

WILL SHIP TO CANADA JUST ASK FOR SHIPPING RATE

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