STRAWBS DRAGONFLY A & M AMLS 970 TEXTURED SLEEVE INSERT DAVE COUSINS MONKS PROG

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  • Item Category: Entertainment
  • Source: eBay UK
  • Sold Date: Mar 19,2012
  • Channel: Online Auction

YOU ARE BIDDING ON A RARE LP

STRAWBS

DRAGONFLY

RELEASED ON A&M RECORDS AMLS 970

MATRIX NUMBERS: AMLS 970 A 1,

AMLS 970 B 1

THIS STEREO RECORD HAS HAND WRITTEN MATRIX NUMBERS AND COMES WITH AN INSERT IN A TEXTURED SLEEVE

THE RECORD AND INSERT ARE IN EXCELLENT CONDITION, THE SLEEVE HAS SLIGHT RINGWEAR, SOME DISCOLOURATION/STAINING DUE TO AGE, AND VERY SLIGHT SIGNS OF AGE/WEAR

WE DO COMBINE POSTAGE FOR ITEMS PURCHASED MEANING THAT WE DO PROVIDE POSTAGE DISCOUNTS ON MULTIPLE PURCHASES WHERE POSSIBLE, AS A RULE THE FIRST LP IS CHARGED AT STANDARD POSTAL RATE AND EACH ITEM THERE AFTER AT AROUND A 50% DISCOUNT, AND THE SAME GOES FOR 7" RECORDS, THERE MAY BE A FEW EXCEPTIONS TO THIS, SUCH AS BEING UNABLE TO COMBINE POSTAGE FOR A POSTER AND A RECORD, PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT US IF YOU ARE STILL UNSURE

ITEMS ARE PACKAGED IN STIFF CARD MAILERS WITH STIFFENERS, AND ARE REMOVED FROM SLEEVES PRIOR TO PACKING-UNLESS THE ITEM IS SOLD AS 'SEALED'

One of the better British progressive bands of the early '70s, the Strawbs differed from their more successful compatriots -- the Moody Blues, King Crimson, Pink Floyd -- principally in that their sound originated in English folk music, rather than rock. Founded in 1967 as a bluegrass-based trio called the Strawberry Hill Boys by singer/guitarist Dave Cousins, the group at that time consisted of Cousins, guitarist/singer Tony Hooper, and mandolinist Arthur Phillips, who was replaced in 1968 by Ron Chesterman on bass. That same year, the group -- now rechristened the Strawbs, and doing repertory well beyond the bounds of bluegrass music -- briefly became a quartet with the temporary addition of Sandy Denny, who stayed long enough to record a relative handful of tracks with the group on the Hallmark label before joining Fairport Convention.
In 1969, the Strawbs were signed to A&M Records, and cut their first album , the acoustic-textured Strawbs, that same year. For their second album, Dragonfly, recorded and released the following year, the group broadened their sound with the presence of a group of session musicians, including piano/organist Rick Wakeman. Soon after the release of this record, the group became a full-fledged band with the addition not only of Wakeman but also Richard Hudson and John Ford, on drums and bass, respectively. These changes, coupled with Cousins' increasing dexterity on electric guitar , gave the Strawbs a much more powerful sound that was showcased on their next album.
The live Just a Collection of Antiques and Curios (1970) sold well, and was followed up the next year with From the Witchwood. In 1971, Wakeman left the Strawbs in order to join Yes; he was replaced by Blue Weaver formerly of the Amen Corner. Grave New World (1972) showed the band entering its strongest period, with Cousins' songwriting augmented by the new prowess of the composing team of Hudson and Ford. The record became their best-selling album to date. Unfortunately, its release also heralded the exit of Tony Hooper. He was replaced by Dave Lambert, a more aggressive, rock-oriented guitarist, and his addition brought the group into its peak period. The Strawbs' 1973 album, Bursting at the Seams, featured two Top Ten U.K. hits, "Lay Down" and "Part of the Union," and one album track, "Down by the Sea," racked up substantial airplay on American FM radio.
It was all too good to last, and it didn't. Blue Weaver left after one more tour, while Hudson and Ford exited to form Hudson-Ford, also signed to A&M. The Strawbs regrouped in 1974 with Hero and Heroine, recorded with a new lineup consisting of Cousins, Lambert, keyboardist John Hawken, bassist Chas Cronk, and drummer Rod Coombes. The new album was a critical and commercial failure in England, but proved popular in America. Their next two albums, Ghosts (1975) and Nomadness (1976), both did better in the U.S. than they did in the U.K. None of this was enough to sustain the group, however, which continued to lose members and also left A&M Records. ...

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