VINTAGE GERMAN EDELWEISS DRESS HAT & HAT PINS

  • Sold for: Start FREE Trial! or Sign In to see what it's worth.
  • Item Category: Militaria & Weapons
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Feb 04,2007
  • Channel: Online Auction

Collectible 1940's green velour

German edelweiss hat with

Edelweiss hat pin, mountain goat hair

hat pin, & Deutschland/US flag pin

You are bidding a 1940's German Edelweiss Hat. The hat is made of a green velour cloth. It has a brown leather hat band, which contains the Edelweiss Hat insignia in gilt lettering. In the inside center of the hat is an Edelweiss flower behind a plastic cover. On the outer side of the hat contains a triple band Bavarian green rope border with the traditional tied loop.

In addition, the hat contains a German pewter hat pin featuring a mountain goat's hair. Also included is an Edelweiss hat pin. The Edelweiss flower, which was the symbol of mountain troops, was worn on the band of the service dress cap and as a patch on the right sleeve. The Edelweiss was established in 1907 as a sign of the Austrian-Hungarian alpine troops by Emperor Franz Joseph I. During WWI (1915), the Edelweiss was granted to the German alpine troops for their bravery. Also included on the hat [opposite side] is a Deutschland, Germany & United States flag pin.

INFORMATION ABOUT THE PREVIOUS OWNER

This item belonged to the late US Air Force Major Dooley H. Rogers. Major Dooley served in WWII and was the Flight Engineer aboard the infamous "Draggin Lady" B-29 bomber. Major Rogers was a crew member in the 881 st Squadron.

On February 27, 1945 while slow timing a new engine, Major Rogers and the Draggin Lady's crew crashed this aircraft in Saipan, Japan. Along for the ride was Lt. Engle (Pilot), Lt. Pavey (Co-pilot), and an unidentified sailor. These three servicemen died as a result of the plane's nose having been submerged and their inability to get out. Remarkably, nine crewmen survived the crash. The actually aircraft, Draggin Lady, is/has been currently on display at the Smithsonian.

Items in the Worthopedia are obtained exclusively from licensors and partners solely for our members’ research needs.

Relevant Articles