RARE WWII PERIOD PHOTO RAVENSBRUCK CONCENTRATION CAMP

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  • Item Category: Militaria & Weapons
  • Source: eBay
  • Sold Date: Aug 14,2009
  • Channel: Online Auction

RARE WWII PERIOD PHOTO RAVENSBRUCK CONCENTRATION CAMP

Description:

RARE WORLD WAR II GENUINE 1945 PHOTOGRAPH OF RAVENSBRUCK NAZI CONCENTRATION CAMP, LOCATED IN BRANDENBURG IN NORTHERN GERMANY, SHOWING A PILE OF NAKED WOMEN PRISONERS' BODIES MURDERED BY THE NAZIS.

A rare genuine radiophoto taken in 1945 and probably sent from Moscow to the U.S. The photograph shows the horror image of a pile of naked women prisoners' bodies murdered by the Nazis. Size approx. 3.5in x 6in (9cm x 15cm). A VG generally clean impression of this very scarce image. Extremely low starting price and sold with NO RESERVE!!

Ravensbrück or Ravensbrueck ( German pronunciation: [?a?f?ns'b??k] ) was a notorious women's concentration camp during World War II , located in northern Germany, 90 km north of Berlin at a site near the village of Ravensbrück (part of Fürstenberg/Havel ).

Construction of the camp began in November 1938 by SS leader Heinrich Himmler and was unusual in that it was a camp primarily for women. The camp opened in May 1939. In the spring of 1941, the SS authorities established a small men's camp adjacent to the main camp.

Between 1939 and 1945, over 130,000 female prisoners passed through the Ravensbrück camp system; only 40,000 survived. Although the inmates came from every country in German-occupied Europe, the largest single national group incarcerated in the camp consisted of Polish women. The first prisoners at Ravensbrück were approximately 900 women. The SS had transferred these prisoners from the Lichtenburg women's concentration camp in Saxony in May 1939. By the end of 1942, the inmate population of Ravensbrück had grown to about 10,000. In January 1945, the camp had more than 45,000 women prisoners.

T were children in the camp as well. At first, they arrived with mothers who were Gypsies or Jews incarcerated in the camp or were born to imprisoned women. T were few of them at the time. T were a few Czech children from Lidice in July 1942. Later the children in the camp represented almost all nations of Europe occupied by Germany. Between April and October 1944 their number increased considerably, consisting of two groups. One group comprised Roma children with their mothers or sisters brought into the camp after the Roma camp in Auschwitz-Birkenau was closed. The other group included mostly children who were brought with Polish mothers sent to Ravensbrück after the collapse of the Warsaw Uprising of 1944, and Jewish children after the Budapest Ghetto was closed. With a few exceptions all these children died of starvation. Ravensbrück had 70 sub-camps used for slave labour that were spread across an area from the Baltic Sea to Bavaria.

Among the thousands executed by the Germans at Ravensbrück were four female members of the British WWII organization Special Operations Executive (Denise Bloch, Cecily Lefort, Lilian Rolfe, and Violette Szabo) as well as the Roman Catholic nun Élise Rivet, Elisabeth de Rothschild, Russian Orthodox nun St. Maria Skobtsova, the 25-year-old French Princess Anne de Bauffremont-Courtenay, and Olga Benário, wife of the Brazilian Communist leader Luís Carlos Prestes. The largest group of executed women at the Ravensbrück camp, 200 in total, was the Polish group of young patriots, members of the Polish Home Army.

Among the survivors of Ravensbrück camp was Christian author and speaker Corrie ten Boom. Corrie ten Boom and her family were arrested by the Nazis for harbouring Jews in their home in Haarlem, the Netherlands. The ordeal of Corrie and her sister, Betsie ten Boom, in the camp is documented in her book The Hiding Place which was also made into a movie. Countess Karolina Lanckoronska, a Polish art historian and author of Michelangelo in Ravensbruck also was imprisoned in the camp from 1943-1945.

When a new prisoner arrived at Ravensbrück they were required to wear a color-coded triangle (a Winkel) that identified them by category, with a letter sewn within the triangle indicating the priso...

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