12 FORKS FRED HARVEY SILVER PLATE ALBANY PATTERN, ART DECO, SANTA FE RAILROAD

12 FORKS FRED HARVEY SILVER PLATE ALBANY PATTERN, ART DECO, SANTA FE RAILROAD INTERNATIONAL SILVER CO., APPROX 7" LONG NORMAL VINTAGE WEAR, NO SILVER WEAR THROUGH
History [ edit ] The Hotel Castañeda, Las Vegas, New Mexico as seen in 2007. An early mission revival style Harvey House (1899) and sister hotel to the Alvarado in Albuquerque, New Mexico . A Super Chief in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1943. The Alvarado is visible on the left.

Before the inclusion of dining cars in passenger trains became common practice, a rail passenger's only option for meal service in transit was to patronize one of the roadhouses often located near the railroad's water stops . Fare typically consisted of nothing more than rancid meat, cold beans, and week-old coffee. Such poor conditions understandably discouraged many Americans from making the journey westward.

The subsequent growth and development of the Fred Harvey Company was closely related to that of AT&SF. Under the terms of an oral agreement, Harvey opened his first depot restaurant in Topeka, Kansas in January 1876. Railroad officials and passengers alike were impressed with Fred Harvey's strict standards for high quality food and first class service. As a result, AT&SF entered into subsequent contracts with Harvey wherein he was given unlimited funds to set up a series of what
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