HONUS WAGNER~UPPER DECK EPIC MATERIAL GAME USED JSY~/16

2006 UPPER DECK UD EPIC SET

GAME USED JERSEY PATCH

~~~EPIC MATERIALS SUBSET~~~

FEATURING ORIGINAL HALL OF FAMER

HONUS WAGNER

Serial #'d: EM~HW

NUMBERED: 13/16

ONLY 16 EXIST.. .

Honus Wagner Honus Wagner Shortstop Born: February 24, 1874 Died: December 6, 1955 (Aged 81) Batted: Right Threw: Right MLB debut July 19, 1897
for the Louisville Colonels Final game September 17, 1917
for the Pittsburgh Pirates Career statistics Batting average .327 Hits 3415 Runs batted in 1732 Teams Louisville Colonels (1897-1899) Pittsburgh Pirates (1900-1917) Career highlights and awards World Series Champion: 1909 National League Pennant: 1903, 1909 NL batting titles (x8) NL RBI title (x5) Led the NL in stolen bases (x4) 200-hit seasons (x2) Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame Elected 1936 Vote 95.13% (first ballot)

Johannes Peter "Honus" Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed "The Flying Dutchman", was an American baseball player who played during the 1890s until the 1910s. In 1936, the Baseball Hall of Fame inducted Wagner as one of the first five members. Although Ty Cobb is frequently cited as the greatest player of the dead-ball era, some contemporaries regarded Wagner as the better all-around player, and most baseball historians consider

Early life and Family

Honus Wagner was born on February 24, 1874 to German immigrants Peter and Katheryn Wagner, in the Pittsburgh neighborhood of Chartiers. The town is now a part of the borough Carnegie. He was one of nine children, however only five lived past childhood. As a child, he was called Hans by his mother, which would later evolve into Honus. "Hans" was also an alternate nickname during his major league career. Wagner dropped out of school at age 12 to help his father and brothers in the coal mines. In their free time, he and his brothers played sandlot baseball and developed their skills to such an extent that three of his brothers would go on to be professionals as well. Wagner's older brother Albert Wagner is often credited for getting Honus his first tryout. In 1916, Wagner married Bessie Baine Smith and the couple went on to have three daughters, Elva Katrina (born 1918), Betty Baine (born 1919), and Virginia Mae (born 1922).

Playing career

Wagner began his career with the Louisville Colonels in 1897, and by the next season was already one of the best hitters in the National League. After the 1899 season, the NL contracted from twelve to eight teams, and the Colonels were one of the teams eliminated. Many of the Colonels, including Wagner, were assigned to the Pittsburgh Pirates, and Wagner played the next 18 seasons for his hometown team.

Wagner helped the Pirates win NL pennants in 1901, 1902 and 1903. In 1903 the Pirates played the Boston Puritans (soon to be renamed the Boston Red Sox) in the first World Series, losing five games to three in a best-of-nine series to a team led by pitcher Cy Young and third baseman-manager Jimmy Collins. In 1909 Wagner led the Pirates to another pennant, and they defeated the Detroit Tigers, led by Ty Cobb, to win their first World Series.

Wagner was hailed as the best-fielding shortstop of his day, and spent significant time in the outfield as well. He would eventually play every position except catcher, even making two appearances as a pitcher.

He led the NL in batting average eight times (only Cobb and Tony Gwynn have led a league in batting that often), slugging percentage six times, on-base percentage four times, total bases six times, doubles seven times, triples three times runs batted in five times and stolen bases five times, despite being bow-legged to the point w a contemporary sportswriter described his running as "resembling the gambols of a caracoling elephant."

His batting average peaked at .381 in 1900, his runs batted in at 126 in 1901, and twice, despite playing his entire career in the pre-1920 "Dead Ball Era...
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