busty HAZEL COURT sexy shoulders legs RARE HAMMER PHOTO

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The Great Horror Photo SALE OF THE CENTURY!

We are auctioning off an extraordinary & one of a kind Horror Photo Archive.

These are 100% original photos , NOT reproductions. We DID NOT print them! They are being sold from collector to collector, with no rights given or implied.

These are the only ones we have!

Once they are sold out... that's it for good! See below for a detailed description of this unique collection.

is your once in a lifetime opportunity to add these never-before seen 8x10 candid and publicity shots to your rare photo collection!

ATTENTION HAMMER GLAMOR COLLECTORS!

A HAMMER HORROR FILM (1957)

Peter Cushing, Robert Urquhart, Hazel Court, Christopher Lee, Valerie Gaunt, Melvyn Hayes in The Curse of Frankenstein Directed by Terence Fisher

Attention: these are very low resolution scans! The actual (8x10) photos are incredibly sharp & crystal clear with no color distortion!

You are bidding on a very RARE color publicity photo of the first official "scream queen" of the Golden Age of Gothic Horror Cinema! She predates Barbara Steele in that title by about 3 years. In this image, Hazel is lying in hay, totally naked, wrapped only in a fur coat!

The Curse of Frankenstein is important for a number of reasons. The film began Hammer's tradition of horror film-making. It also marked the beginning of a Gothic horror revival in the cinema on both sides of the Atlantic, paralleling the rise to fame of Universal's Dracula and Frankenstein series in the 1930s. The level of gore and violence was pioneering, and much condemned at the time âe" although this film, and Fisher/Hammer's subsequent Gothic horrors, can be seen as the forebear of the modern horror film. Hammer's version of Frankenstein differed from Universal's in several important ways: * the films were in color, not black-and-white, * the focus was on the Baron rather than the creature, * the Baron was assisted by young men eager for greater knowledge rather than hunchbacks (like Fritz in Frankenstein (1931) or Nina in House of Dracula). The film's structure also opens it up to an interesting interpretation, that being that the story of the creature is nothing more than an hallucination of Baron Frankenstein's. The majority of the film takes place as a flashback, with the Baron relating the story to his friend Paul, which means that this version of the truth of the murders for which the Baron is condemned might be taking place only in his own mind. This is reinforced by Paul's comment to Elizabeth -- who had been the Baron's fiance -- at the end of the film, that t is nothing more they can do for him. Taken one way, they can't help him avoid the guillotine. Taken another way, Paul is cynically sacrificing the Baron (and the truth about the creature's existence) so he can run off with Elizabeth. Taken a third way, Paul recognizes that the Baron is hopelessly insane, and is guilty of the murders, despite his desire to blame them on his imaginary creature. No subsequent Hammer horror film had this level of ambiguity.

Source: Wikipedia

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ATTENTION COLLECTORS! These original 8x10 photos come from an extraordinary & one-of-a-kind Horror Photo Archive, assembled in 1992-93 for an International Horror Cinema Exhibition , with cooperation from some of the major Hollywood film studios , who gave the Exhibition's curators unprecedented access to their precious image archives. The curators were allowed to professionally develop pristine 8x10 photos directly from the studios' original negatives and transparencies , on premium grade Kodak (silver gelatin) archival photographic paper yielding incredible results!

This was very expensive photo paper... the #1 choice of pro photographers. It contained actual microscopic silver ...

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