THE PRINCESS BRIDE SIGNED MOVIE SCRIPT BY 9 *VERY RARE

MINT CONDITION! is a COLOR COPY of an ENTIRE signed script of the HIT MOVIE: " The Princess Bride ". This is a 1987 Shooting Draft directed & signed by Rob Reiner. These are autographs of:

Cary Elwes , Chris Sarandon , Christopher Guest, Fred Savage, Robin Wright Penn, Peter Falk, Mel Smith, Carol Kane, & Rob Reiner !

"My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die."

When William Goldman wrote those words, he did not intend for them to become a fragment of '80s pop culture. When Mandy Patinkin spoke those words, he didn't expect his every inflection to be endlessly mimicked. And when Rob Reiner directed those words, he had no idea that kids and young adults everyw would be repeating them. Nevertheless, t's no doubting that nearly every movie-going American is familiar with those three short sentences. Reiner has stated that, along with "I'll have what she's having" and "You can't handle the truth," this represents one of the three most often quoted excerpts of dialogue from his movies.

It's an odd line to mimic, especially taken out of context. For example, you can't go in to your boss looking for a raise and state, "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die." Chances are, you're not going to get that pay hike. Likewise, when meeting a date, the best choice of an opening is not, "My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die." Nevertheless, even though t is no practical use for this dialogue snippet, that hasn't dimmed its popularity.

But those lines are only a very small part of what makes The Princess Bride such a special motion picture. And, for those who crave features that can be enjoyed by every member of the family (grammar school kid, teenage troublemaker, tough-to-please twenty-something, beleaguered mom and dad, and grumpy grandparents), t may be nothing better than this motion picture, which celebrates fairy tales and true love with its tongue firmly planted in its cheek. This is what happens when stories of heroism and derring-do collide head-on with a Monty Python sensibility. Best of all, despite its satirical bent, The Princess Bride can still be enjoyed on the simpler level of the story of a princess being rescued by her one true love.

The Princess Bride is constructed as a story-within-a-story, with the framing scenes occurring in the "real world" as a grandfather (Peter Falk) stops by to read a story to his sick grandson (Fred Savage). During these scenes, Reiner makes a statement about the value of books over electronic forms of entertainment. When the grandfather arrives, his grandson is playing a video game, a blank expression on his face. But, once the story takes flight in his imagination, he is absorbed and transfixed - transported to another time and place in a way that even the best electronic game cannot accomplish.

The primary narrative, which evolves as the grandfather reads it (and occasionally interrupts it to intersperse comments or skip over boring parts), takes place in the magical land of Florin, and tells of the true love between peasant girl Butercup (Robin Wright, years before marry Sean Penn) and stablehand Westley (Cary Elwes). After declaring their unending affection for each other, they are separated, and Westley is reported dead. Buttercup, cold-hearted and stone-faced after her loss, is chosen by the crown prince, Humperdinck (Chris Sarandon), to be his bride. Humperdinck's motives, however, are not pure. He intends to arrange for Buttercup's abduction, frame rival country Guilder for her murder, and start a war with the backing of the common folk, who love their princess-to-be. To this end, he hires three rogues to capture Buttercup: the wily Sicilian Vizzini (Wallace Shawn), who fancies himself to be the smartest man in the world and has a fondness for the word "inconceivable;" the giant Fezzik (Andre the Giant), who is dumb, kind-hearted, and humungous; and the swordsman Inigo Montoya (Mandy Pantankin), who is scouring the world in search of the six-fingered ...

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